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alteryx server Knowledge Base

Definitive answers from Server experts.
Everything you need to get started with your own instance of Server!
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Use the following instructions to download and complete installation via the Alteryx installation wizard in v2018.1!
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How to check what's using the port and steps for changing some services' default port!
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The  Alteryx License Server  is an implementation of our technology partner  Flexera Software ’s  Local License Server , and allows for the deployment of a local license server within an organizations’ internal network. This allows for a smoother and more secure deployment of Alteryx products, especially behind proxies and firewalls.
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Now, find all your Server and Gallery questions and answers in one place!  The new Gallery Admin Help Page has your Server Installation Guide, Configuration instructions, and the much-requested Administer Gallery management features - Subscriptions and Studios defined!  Manage your user permissions!  Edit user accounts!   
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Receiving the error below when attempting to schedule a module?   “An error occurred in the scheduler. Server Error: 500 Server Error GetExpectedValue: Expected “Container” but got “Sid” Incorrect type requested 1 actual 4”   Post v10.5 release, your Alteryx Server and working environment must be of the same version in order to enjoy the upgrades of the release and still be able to commit scheduled workflows correctly. When the versions of your worker and server do not match, you’ll receive the error above. While our recommendation is to be using the most up to date release, you can always upgrade or revert your designer version either at our Downloads page (current version) or the Previous Releases webpage. To check on the version you’re using, you can navigate in the Designer to the Help >> About menu.
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Alteryx Server on Azure Prerequisites To work with Alteryx Server on Azure, you will need: An Azure subscription. If you don’t have an Azure subscription, you can sign up for a free trial. Microsoft Remote Desktop (RDP) software. Remote Desktop is used to connect to the virtual machine (VM) running Alteryx Server. An Alteryx Server license. An Alteryx Server installer. Installers can be downloaded from alteryx.com. Select your Windows Server version and VM size Select a Windows Server version and VM size that meets or exceeds the system requirements for Alteryx Server. Take a look at Azure’s VM size table to see what size best fits your needs. Make sure to consider price vs. performance. Larger VMs perform better but cost more.    Step 1: Create a VM   1. Log in to the Azure portal. 2. Click on the Newbutton in the top left.     3. Click on Virtual Machines   4. Choose a version of Windows Server. Select Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter if you don’t have a preference.    5. At the bottom of the page, click the Create button.   6. Fill out the required information in the Basicssection of the Create Virtual Machine pane. Click the OK button at the bottom to move on after you’ve filled out the required fields. Name: A name for your VM. User name: A user that will have the ability to RDP into the VM. Password: The password for the above user. Subscription: If you have multiple subscriptions, choose which subscription to put the VM in. Resource group: Resource groups help group together related VMs. Either create a new resource group or place the new server into an existing group of similar resources. Location: Where you’d like the server to be placed. You should select a location that will be closest to your users for optimum performance.   7. In the Sizesection, choose a size that meets the tech specs for Alteryx Server. When ready, click the Select button at the bottom.   8. In the Settingssection, configure the various settings for how you’d like to configure the VM. Generally, you’ll want to leave the defaults in place. For Availability Set select None. Click the OK button at the bottom when done.   9. Review the VM settings in the Summarypane and make sure everything looks correct. Click the OK button at the bottom when ready.   10. Click on the VM once it’s been deployed. Click Settings > Network Interfaces > $INTERFACE > Network security group > Inbound security rules > Addto start adding a new rule to the security group.   11. Add a rule for HTTP access. This will allow installations of Alteryx Designer to talk to the Alteryx Server VM. Give the rule a name and change the Protocol to TCP. It is highly recommended to change the Source setting to be locked down to an IP address or an IP range that you control. When finished, click the OK button. Add more access rules as needed for any other IP addresses or IP ranges. Step 2: Connect to the VM   Click on the Virtual Machinesentry on the left side of the page. Click on the VM’s name in the list. Click on the Connect This will download an .rdp file for Remote Desktop connections. Open the file downloaded in the previous step. If you see a warning that the publisher of the remote connection can’t be identified, click Connect. This will open a new Remote Desktop connection. Enter the user name and password set during VM creation. Step 3: Install Alteryx Server Installing Alteryx Server in Azure is similar to installing on any other server.   Note: If you plan on using a Gallery with Windows authentication, you’ll need to set up Active Directory in Azure. For more information, see Install a replica Active Directory domain controller in an Azure virtual network in the Azure documentation. Download the installer from alteryx.com. Note: The default security policy of Internet Explorer in Azure is set to High. This means that you’ll have to manually add downloads.alteryx.comto your list of trusted sites.   OR Copy the installer from your computer. If you’ve already downloaded the Alteryx Server installer to your computer, you can copy it as you would any other file into a folder on the Azure VM. Double-click on the installer from the Azure VM. This process is the same as installing Alteryx Server on any other computer. Step 4: Connect to Alteryx Server   Activate your license. Get the Controller Token from the Azure VM from the Alteryx System Settings Open port 80 on the Windows Firewall. In Alteryx Designer, go to Options > Schedule Workflow. In the Controllerdropdown, select Connect to Controller... Paste in the DNS name or IP of the Azure VM and the Alteryx Server Controller Token from Step 2.
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Recently, we have had a number of questions regarding SSL certificates, how to install them, and how to configure Alteryx Server to use them. While the Alteryx Server Installation and Configuration Guide does cover enabling SSL for Alteryx Server, it doesn’t cover obtaining a certificate, or how to install that certificate so it can be used by the server.   There are a number of tools and methods you can use to obtain a SSL certificate to use with Alteryx Server.  In this article we will be focusing on using OpenSSL to create a Certificate Signing Request (CSR) to send to a Certificate Authority (CA), generating a self-signed certificate, installing the certificate, and configuring Alteryx Server to use the certificate.   Note: If you don’t have OpenSSL installed on your server you can download a precompiled Win32 or Win64 binary from https://slproweb.com/products/Win32OpenSSL.html. Please keep in mind that OpenSSL is not developed, or maintained by Alteryx. That we have no affiliation with the OpenSSL project, or the provider of this precompiled binary. As such feel free to use which ever implementation of OpenSSL you are comfortable with.   Creating a Certificate Signing Request with OpenSSL:   To generate a CSR, open an administrator command prompt on your server and navigate to the directory containing your OpenSSL.exe and configuration file. From there run the following command:   openssl.exe req -config openssl.cfg -out ServerName.csr -new -newkey rsa:2048 -nodes -keyout ServerName.key   This will prompt you to answer a number of questions related to your organization and the server. You can use the included a screenshot for your reference, but keep in mind the responses should be based on your organization and server information.     This command will create two files in the same directory with a .csr and .key extension. These files will need to be provided to your CA in order to have your certificate created. This can be either an internal CA, or a public CA such as; Verisign, GeoTrust, DigiCert, Entrust, StartCom, etc. The CA will provide you with a signed certificate in return as a .crt, .cer, .pem, or .pfx file.   Creating a Self-Signed Certificate with OpenSSL:   You can also use OpenSSL to generate a self-signed certificate. While this isn’t recommended for production environments there maybe a number of reasons why you would want to create one. Some possible reasons include dev or lab environments, and testing to confirm functionality before purchasing a certificate from a public CA. Regardless of your reason you can do so with the following procedure:   Open an administrator command prompt and navigate to your OpenSSL directory. Once there, run these commands:   openssl.exe req -config openssl.cfg -x509 -sha256 -nodes -days 365 -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout ServerName.key -out ServerName.crt openssl.exe pkcs12 -export -out ServerName.pfx -inkey ServerName.key -in ServerName.crt   The first command generates a signed certificate (.crt file) and private key (.key file). The second command creates a combined certificate and key file in a .pfx format from the generated certificate and key. Please keep in mind you will be asked the same or similar questions as you would if you were generating a CSR. Please reference the screenshots below:       Note: As previously stated we do not recommend using self-signed certificates in production environments.   Installing the Certificate:   Once we have received the signed certificate from the CA or generated a self-signed certificate we need to install it. To install the certificate we need to open a Microsoft Management Console (MMC) to access the Certificates snap-in by following these steps:   Click Start and then click Run. In the command line, type MMC and then click OK. In the Microsoft Management Console (MMC), on the File menu, click Add/Remove Snap-in. In the Add Remove Snap-in dialog box, click Add. In the Add Standalone Snap-in dialog box, select Certificates and then click Add. In the Certificates snap-in dialog box, select the Computer account radio button because the certificate needs to be made available to all users, and then click Next. In the Select Computer dialog box, leave the default Local computer: (the computer this console is running on) selected and then click Finish. In the Add Standalone Snap-in dialog box, click Close. In the Add/Remove Snap-in dialog box, click OK.   Next, we need to actually import the certificate. To do this:   Expand Certificates > Personal Right click on certificates under personal Select All Tasks > Import.     This will open the certificate import wizard.     Click Next       Browse to the certificate file provided by your CA, or the pfx file generated in the self-signing instructions Click Next   If you are using a self-signed certificate, or your CA issued a certificate that includes the private key you will be prompted for the password/phrase. Otherwise this step will be skipped by the import wizard.     Enter the password Check the box to mark this key as exportable Click Next   The next screen will ask to confirm where you want to place the certificate. This should have the Certificate store set to ‘Personal’ already.      Set the Certificate store to Personal if needed Click next On the next screen click Finished   If you are installing a self-signed certificate we need to repeat these steps in order to establish the local server as a trusted authority. To do this install the certificate a second time following the same steps as above. Except this time we are going to install it to the Trusted Root Certificate Authorities store instead of the Personal store. You can do this by expanding Trusted Root Certificate Authorities, right clicking on certificates, and choosing All Tasks > Import, or by changing the Certificate store at the end of the import wizard.       Configuring Alteryx Server to Use the Certificate:   At this point you can follow the detailed instructions in the Alteryx Server Installation and Configuration Guide to complete the configuration. Alternatively (and for completeness), you can continue with these simplified instructions.   First you need to collect the certificate thumbprint for the certificate you installed above. You can do this from MMC > Certificates > Personal > Certificates by right clicking on the installed certificate and choosing open. This will open a certificate dialog for the certificate you installed. From there, select the Details tab and find the Thumbprint field. Copy the value and remove all spaces from it (e.g. ‎74d4ca722e2954cd225f9b4697d2fc7f6747194c).     Next, you need to bind http port 443 to the certificate. To do so, open your administrator command prompt again. Then run the following command, making sure to replace the certhash with the thumbprint value you captured:   netsh http add sslcert ipport=0.0.0.0:443 certhash=‎74d4ca722e2954cd225f9b4697d2fc7f6747194c appid={eea9431a-a3d4-4c9b-9f9a-b83916c11c67}     To check that the binding is correct, you can run the following command:   netsh http show sslcert       Note: When renewing an expired or expiring certificate, you will need to delete the current binding (netsh http delete sslcert ipport=0.0.0.0:443), capture the thumbprint of the new certificate, and rebind the certificate using the instructions above.   For the final step, you will need to configure the Gallery service to use SSL. To do this open Alteryx System Settings and click Next until you reach Gallery > General. Once there find the Base Address section and check the box to Enable SSL. Then click Next, Finished, or Done as appropriate to apply the settings change and restart the Alteryx Service.     Note: The URL must also match the name the certificate was issued to. As such, if the certificate was issued to the server's fully qualified domain name (e.g. hostname.domain.tld), your URL needs to match this by using https://hostname.domain.tld/gallery/. If the certificate was issued to just the hostname, you would need to use https://hostname/gallery/. If the URL doesn’t match the certificate the service will fail to start properly.       Applicable versions: Alteryx Server 10.0 & 10.1 Credits:
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