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alteryx server Knowledge Base

Definitive answers from Server experts.
How To: Modify Gallery Session Timeout   This article shows how to modify the session timeout for the Gallery.  A session timeout specifies the number of minutes that a Gallery session can remain idle (inactive) before the session will be terminated.  The default session timeout value is 60 minutes.  When the session timeout occurs the user will be returned to the Sign In page:       Note: This setting applies to Built-in or SAML authentication only.  When using Integrated Windows authentication Alteryx does not enforce a session timeout as the user has a valid Windows session.       Prerequisites   Alteryx Server Authentication Type:  Built-in or SAML   Procedure   If you have a multi-machine Server environment, the following steps should be performed on the Gallery node(s) only.   Open Windows File Explorer and navigate to %PROGRAMDATA%\Alteryx\. Create a backup of the RuntimeSettings.xml file.  Open the RuntimeSettings.xml file in an editor and add the following line in the Gallery section: <SessionTimeout>20</SessionTimeout> Example RuntimeSettings.xml file with a 20 minute session timeout. Save the file and restart the AlteryxService.      Additional Resources   Gallery System Settings
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Alteryx Server System Settings Deep Dive - Engine     Introduction   This is the first in a series of articles to explore the Alteryx Server System Settings in depth to gain a deeper knowledge of what these settings are used for, and to provide a bit more context to help you determine the appropriate settings for your environment.  Every organization's deployment, use cases, and business requirements are different and thus there is no single configuration to fit all.  Having an understanding of the implications of each setting is vital in setting up your Alteryx Server for success.   We’ll explore the system settings for Alteryx Server as of 2019.2, through a series of articles for each component, starting with the Engine. The Alteryx Engine consumes Alteryx workflows and provides high-speed data processing and analytics functionality. This process can be entirely self-contained in Alteryx Designer, scaled across an organization by the Alteryx Service, or deployed in the cloud by the Alteryx Gallery.     Engine Settings   The Alteryx Server System Settings configuration wizard allows end users to modify the Engine configuration settings:   Engine Configuration   Any changes to the configuration settings in the System Settings wizard are applied to the RuntimeSettings.xml file, found at: %ProgramData%\Alteryx\RuntimeSettings.xml   Note, this file should never be modified through an editor unless specifically requested from Alteryx Customer Support.    A few of these settings are self-explanatory and sufficiently described in the Help.  However, many of these can often be confusing, and some have performance implications that aren’t well understood. The subsequent sections will dive into these settings in more detail.     Temporary Directory   “The Engine Temporary Directory is the place where temporary files used in processed workflows and apps will be placed. This setting should point to a location that is safe to write large amounts of files.”    The Engine Temporary directory is a parent directory in which each workflow executed creates a sub directory for storing data needed during the processing of the workflow.  Below is not an exhaustive list, but includes the most common types of data stored in the Engine temporary directory: Browse Tool Support - Every Browse Tool in the workflow creates a separate Alteryx Database file (.yxdb) that stores the contents of the data you see in the Browse’s Results and Configuration windows. The Browse Tool allows you to view all the data as opposed to a sample, and therefore the created .yxdb files could be quite large if the data sets being processed are large.  Therefore, the number of Browse Tools should not be prolific. NOTE: The temporary .yxdb files are only created when an Alteryx Workflow is run in Designer.  When workflows are executed through the Gallery or a schedule, browse tools are disabled. Browse Everywhere Support – The Browse Everywhere features allows you to click on the output anchor of a given tool and see a sample of the data at that point in the workflow.  All the data viewable in the various output anchors across a workflow is stored in one Alteryx Browse Everywhere file (.yxbe).  The size of this file is determined by how many tools are in the workflow multiplied by the “Memory Limit Per Anchor” size which will be discussed later in this article. NOTE: The temporary .yxbe file is only created when an Alteryx Workflow is run in Designer.  When worfklows are executed through the Gallery or a schedule, Browse Everywhere is disabled.  Tool Specific Support – Some tools create temporary files as part of their processing, for example the Download and Spatial Match tools. Paging / Swap Space – When the Engine's memory processing requirements exceed that of the “Default sort/join memory usage” setting (covered later in the article), temporary files (.tmp) are created to retain data that can be quickly retrieved later. The number and size of these temp files is determined by the size of the data sets being processed, and the types of tools in the workflow.  The Engine 101 Basics blog does a great job of describing how certain “blocking” tools need access to all rows of a dataset to process it.  The presence of these blocking tools will drive up the likelihood that the Engine will need to use temporary files to complete its processing.   Example Engine Temp directory for a running workflow where the files described above are evident. These files are all deleted when the workflow processing is complete.  For a Designer user, this means when the Workflow is closed or upon initiating another execution of the Alteryx Workflow in Designer.  For a Server user, this means upon completion of the workflow execution.  Note, the Engine Temporary Directory is used when running workflows from Alteryx Designer.   When running on an Alteryx Server, the Worker’s “Workspace” directory is used to store these temporary files.   Recommendations It is highly recommended to set the Temporary Directory to a different drive than your system boot drive (C:\). If the C:\ drive on Windows fills up, the system can become unresponsive or even unstable.  If an additional drive (D:\) fills up, no harm is done to Windows and the system will remain functional. The Temporary Directory is used for frequent I/O operations to read and write data. Configuring this directory on Flash/SSD storage is a great way to improve performance by minimizing the wait times for those read & write operations to complete.  See the Measuring and Scaling a Private Server blog post for more information.    When running in Designer, minimize the use of Browse Tools when working with large data sets to reduce workflow processing times and keep the Temp directory from filling up. Understand that temporary directories can grow quite large during processing if working with large data sets and doing lots of sorts, joins, or other blocking operations. As an example, we saw a temporary directory grow over 150GB in size processing a 12GB data set.  Your mileage will certainly vary based on data set sizes and tools used.     Memory Limit Per Anchor “Define the maximum amount of memory to use to consume data for each output anchor for tools in a workflow. The default value typically does not need to be changed.”    This setting applies when running in Designer only as mentioned in the Browse Everywhere section.  The Browse Everywhere feature allows a user to see a sample of the data (up to Memory Limit Per Anchor in size) at the output anchor of every tool.  The default value is 1024 KB (1MB).     This workflow would produce a .yxbe file of approximately 12MB. This is a great way to analyze your data without using the Browse tools which will write the entire dataset contents to disk.     A sample of the data can be seen in the output anchor of each tool. In the event of the Temporary Directory not having enough space to create the .yxbe file, the following will be logged: Warning - Alteryx: Disk space on temp drive running low.  No browse everywhere data created.   Recommendations Keeping the default Memory Limit per Anchor setting makes sense for most scenarios. In situations where you are building a workflow with a very large data set, and the 1 MB sample just isn't enough to give you the information you need, but the full Browse tool is too heavy, it might make sense to increase this value. However, make this change on the local Designer (laptop/desktop) and not the Server which is used by many end users.  This change can be made in Designer under Options -> User Settings -> Edit User Settings: Designer users can override the Memory Limit per Anchor in the Advanced User Settings.     Default sort/join memory usage "This is the minimum amount of memory that the Engine will consume while performing operations such as Sorts and Joins within a workflow or app. Generally, this value should not be changed.”    The Engine "Default sort/join memory usage" setting and the Worker “ Maximum sort/join memory usage ” setting have generated a lot of questions that I hope this section clears up. There are three key points to clarify:   If making changes, the Engine "Default sort/join memory usage" is the setting that should always be specified and what we'll focus on in this article. For Designer users, this value can be specified in the Options --> User Settings --> Edit User Settings wizard: The Default Dedicated Sort/Join Memory Usage setting This setting is both a minimum and a maximum.  It's a minimum in that this amount of memory will be "committed" to each Engine process (running workflow)  regardless of how much memory the Engine actually consumes processing the workflow.  Therefore this amount of memory is reserved for each Engine process and not usable by other applications.  It's a maximum in that the Engine process will not consume more memory than this value. If the Engine needs more resources than the setting specified, it will start utilizing the temp (swap) space as described earlier.  If the workflow launches additional processes, such as from the Run Command tool, or R by the use of Predictive Tools, those processes are NOT controlled by this setting. Other processes are not controlled by the Engine Default Sort/Join Memory Usage setting The setting is not specific to Sorts and Joins.   As described in the Engine 101 Basics blog, “blocking” tools require access to all data for execution.  This drives up memory consumption.  Sort, Join, and Summarize operations are the most commonly used blocking tools but there are many others, easily identifiable with a red border in the Periodic Table of Alteryx Tools .  Any workflow executing these blocking tools with high row count data sets (millions of rows) will consume lots of memory.   If the Sort/Join memory setting requested exceeds the amount of physical RAM available, Alteryx will revert to a lower value that is safe to commit.  In that case a message like the following will be logged in the Alteryx Engine logs: 00:00:0.003 - Alteryx: Allocating requested dedicated sort/join memory would be more than available physical memory.  Reverting to 2912MB of memory.                  Recommendations Only make changes to the Engine "Default sort/join memory usage" setting if necessary.  The default value works well for most scenarios, and we routinely see problems occur when this value is changed without understanding when and how to configure it. The below recommendations are just starting points. It is always recommended to configure and then test with representative workflows and usage patterns.  Then reconfigure and repeat the process until the optimum values are identified. To properly calculate a reasonable Sort/Join Memory value, we must know how many workflows will be configured to run simultaneously. This number should be determined by a server sizing exercise, and for existing customers, also take into account data from the Server Usage Report, such as queue times and job execution times.  For Designer only users the number of simultaneous workflows will be 1. For non-predictive workflows, a good starting point would be: The 4GB reservation ensures the OS and other system services are not starved of memory.  If the machine will also be supporting the Gallery and Controller, then that reservation should be increased to at least 8 GB. If the predictive tools will be used then additional memory should be reserved for the R processes.  In that case a good starting point would be: The expectation is that the machine will only be used for Alteryx processing and not shared with other applications. If other applications will also be running, then their memory requirements need to be factored into the equations above. Again, the above recommendations are just starting points. It is always recommended to configure and then test with representative workflows and usage patterns.  Then reconfigure and repeat the process until the optimum values are identified.     Default number of processing threads   “Define the number of processing threads tools or operations can use. The default value is the number of available processor cores plus one. Generally, this value should not be changed.”   This setting is determining the number of processing threads that multi-threaded tools can use.  The multi-threaded tools are identifiable in the  Periodic Table of Alteryx Tools .  (Sort and some Spatial tools highlight the list).  Configuring a higher value here may facilitate more parallelism which may result in faster completion times in the execution of these multi-threaded tools, assuming the machine has the capacity to use the specified number of threads.  Specifying a higher than needed thread pool size can lead to an over-committed system in which the CPU is constantly context switching between threads which may produce longer processing times.    In Windows Task Manager, the "Logical processors" metric shows us the maximum number of concurrent processing threads on that server:       Recommendations To reduce workflow run times using multi-threaded tools, set the Default number of processing threads equal to the number of Logical processors. If the server will be executing multiple workflows simultaneously, consider using a lower value to ensure that no workflows are starved of CPU.     Run engine at a lower priority   “Select if you are running other memory intensive applications simultaneously. It is also recommended that this setting be checked for a machine configured to run the Gallery.” The Windows Scheduling Priorities doc is a great resource to understand why this setting is important.  To summarize, Windows assigns time slices of CPU time to processes based on their priority level.  Applications with a higher priority will be given more CPU time than applications with a lower priority.  This ensures higher priority applications get more processor time when the system is heavily utilized.   Most applications default to “Normal” priority.  Some critical Windows processes have a “High” priority, such as the logon and desktop window manager processes.  Alteryx installs all Server components (AlteryxService, Gallery, Designer, etc…) with the “Normal” priority.  By default, this includes the Engine as well.  This could lead to a scenario where resource intensive workflows are running, and the Alteryx Service layer, the Gallery, or even Designer are struggling to get CPU time since they all share the same priority level.  This also could inhibit mouse & keyboard inputs, and background disk flushing.   Running the Engine at a lower priority will allow these components to remain responsive even during periods of heavy workload processing.   Recommendations This setting should be enabled in all Server deployments (Controller, Worker, Gallery) to ensure Windows components, and the Alteryx Server components always get priority over intensive Engine processes.    Conclusion   The Alteryx Engine has many settings that can impact workflow performance and resource consumption.  Understanding how each of these settings are used by the Engine, and how some settings even impact others, will allow administrators to configure Alteryx Server optimally for their environment and usage.      References https://help.alteryx.com/server/current/admin/Configuration/SystemSettings/Engine.htm https://community.alteryx.com/t5/Alteryx-Knowledge-Base/The-Alteryx-Engine-101-The-Basics/ta-p/405649 https://community.alteryx.com/t5/Engine-Works-Blog/The-Periodic-Table-of-Alteryx-tools/ba-p/64120 https://community.alteryx.com/t5/Engine-Works-Blog/Measuring-and-Scaling-a-Private-Server/ba-p/8786  
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How to check what's using the port and steps for changing some services' default port!
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Alteryx Server provides a fully scalable architecture that allows an organization to scale Alteryx to automate data analytics, tackle bigger projects, process larger datasets and put self-service data analytics into the hands of more decision makers. From scaling Worker nodes to Gallery nodes to the MongoDB persistence layer, Alteryx Server allows organizations to efficiently manage their automated and self-service data analytics needs.
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One common reason why the Alteryx Service appears stuck in the 'Stopping' state is when the service is trying to stop but the AlteryxEngineCmd.exe process is running. In other words, a workflow is running. The Alteryx Service cannot be stopped when a workflow is running due to a schedule or a Gallery run.
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Now, find all your Server and Gallery questions and answers in one place!  The new Gallery Admin Help Page has your Server Installation Guide, Configuration instructions, and the much-requested Administer Gallery management features - Subscriptions and Studios defined!  Manage your user permissions!  Edit user accounts!   
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One of the three database options when setting up the Alteryx Server is to connect into a User-Managed MongoDB instance.  Why would you want to set up your own implementation of MongoDB?  The main benefits are to take advantage of the features of MongoDB that are not included with our embedded instance.
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Question The below question was originally asked in the Discussion boards and comes up somewhat frequently from Server users:  Where I'm left scratching my head is how to best set up Gallery, manage permissions, and manage schedules. In an ideal world, I guess I'd see it going like this: Developers create workflows & upload to private gallery Admin (me) updates connection strings and performs cursory review before moving it into a shared area. Developers should be prevented from doing this.  QA team reviews and gives signoff. Admin (me) moves to a shared area (a collection?) and schedules the workflow as needed.  Developers sho uld be prevented from doing this.  Is this approach feasible given the functionality of Gallery? For now, it seems somewhat all-or-nothing to me. If I make somebody an Artisan, it seems like they can publish things to the gallery, schedule workflows, etc. But I may be completely missing something here.    Also, I'm using Windows authentication and I don't see any way to add users to a Subscription. There's literally no button below the Artisans & Members boxes. How do I do this? Answer The below answer was provided KoryC:   What you're wanting to do is very similar to what we see other customers looking to accomplish - essentially, better and more granular control over what users can do within given projects, and a promotion process of workflows. Today, our Gallery does indeed, as you mention, provide the artisan access as a sort of all or nothing type of deployment. So unfortunately, the level of access control you're looking for today is not yet available, but it is on our roadmap and something we are actively looking at for a future release - this is one of our top priorities.   So today, the best approach is indeed to make those developers artisans. Yes, this will enable them to make things public or share them even if they shouldn't, but there are still administrative capabilities, such as removal of workflows, that can help in case such accidents or activities occur.   And as for the user-to-studio management in Windows Auth mode - we're looking to get that button added for an upcoming release, and on top of that, taking a good look and building out some better and easier ways of managing users in Windows Auth mode in general, much in alignment with how we want to make user and gallery management easier in the future.   Let me know if this helps. I know it's not the ideal answer you'd want today, but we are looking to make some significant improvements here. I'd also greatly appreciate any time you may have to go over features like this and to get more direct feedback in the future too!   As far as your question regarding Windows Auth vs. Built-in - no, it's not required to use built-in for subscription artisans (though members don't make much sense in a Windows Auth environment). It is, however, trickier to manage, as you've discovered. The facilities for managing studios-to-users in Windows Auth are lacking at the moment, and it's an area we're looking to improve. Copying and editing the subscription key is indeed the only way. And yes, only one subscription per user - though this is another area we are looking at expanding upon in the future.   There is a button in v10.5 to add artisans to a studio, but not for members, which will likely ultimately go away, at least with Windows Authentication deployments.   For more information about Gallery Administration and setup, take a look at the following article. The link goes to the first of a four part article series: Alteryx Gallery Administration  
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Changing your private gallery URL can be very important, particularly when inviting end users to run applications, download macros and run workflows from your company's gallery.    There are few steps you will have to take to make this happen:   The URL The default URL will look like this: http://localhost/gallery/ The part of the URL which is editable is the "localhost" part and this can be changed to the IP or Machine Name of the server The reason for the /gallery is when the full Alteryx Server is loaded and configured, AlteryxService (the Scheduler) takes root / for itself.  Since both the Scheduler and Gallery can’t coexist in the same area, Gallery is moved into its own subfolder DSN Settings DSN settings will need to be altered when you set up a  fully qualified domain name  (FQDN) For example pointing a server with the computer name of ir-lt-jb-01 and an IP address of XXX.XXX.XX.XXXX to jordanbarker.alteryx.com.  You will need to get your company's IT department to make these edits as they will have access to their DNS servers Best,  Jordan Barker Solutions Consultant 
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Users have noticed that a private gallery that is enabled with Kerberos sometimes will not work with Firefox.  Chrome and IE might seem to pick up the credentials and display the gallery correctly, however, Firefox will present a blank page. This is because by default Firefox blocks all SPEGNO challenges from any web server. We need to configure Firefox to whitelist these sites to allow these requests to come through.   Open Firefox and enter about:config in the address bar. Dismiss any warnings that appear. In the search bar, enter negotiate. Double-click the network.negotiate-auth.trusted-uris preference.  This preference lists the trusted sites for Kerberos authentication. In the dialog box, enter the Gallery domain, such as example.com. Click the OK button. The domain that you just entered in the network.negotiate-auth.trusted-uris should now appear in Value column.  
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Question How do you reserve port 80 on a server for a reverse proxy that Alteryx Server would sit behind?  Ideally, anything off the box could still connect using 80, but locally it would be configured it to use a different port. Answer The Service Port can be currently only be modified by manually editing a key configuration file called "RuntimeSettings.xml."  It's important to note that there are two files with this name installed on a Server:   There is a read-only file called RuntimeSettings.xml installed in the root Alteryx installation folder, which by default is C:\Program Files\ Alteryx\bin\RuntimeData\RuntimeSettings.xml .  This is the  core settings  configuration file used by Alteryx and must never be edited . There is a second file called RuntimeSettings.xml located at C:\ProgramData\Alteryx\RuntimeSettings.xml.  This file is created and modified by the Alteryx System Settings dialog, and contains settings overridden from the base configuration file in (1). **Please note that the settings should only ever be modified using the Alteryx System Settings dialog, as incorrect or incomplete settings could prevent your server from running correctly.**   Please reach out Alteryx prior to performing any manual modification of your Server configuration.  This is especially important if you are running a multiple-node Server installation, as all nodes will need their Controller information updated.  Similarly, Alteryx Designer users using the Scheduler will also be impacted by the change.   If you "must" change the Service Port be sure to: Schedule planned Server downtime with your Server users Stop the Server (using the Service Control Manager or Services tab in Task Manager) Navigate to C:\ProgramData\Alteryx\ Create a copy of the file RuntimeSettings.xml A an Administrator, start Notepad and open RuntimeSettings.xml Under the "Controller" section of the XML, add the tag <ServicePort>your_desired_service_port</ServicePor t> Save the RuntimeSettings.xml file Open Alteryx System Settings and add the port to the Base Address like so: http://localhost:your_desired_service_port/gallery/ Start the Server  (using the Service Control Manager or Services tab in Task Manager) Verify Server operation
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Receiving the error below when attempting to schedule a module?   “An error occurred in the scheduler. Server Error: 500 Server Error GetExpectedValue: Expected “Container” but got “Sid” Incorrect type requested 1 actual 4”   Post v10.5 release, your Alteryx Server and working environment must be of the same version in order to enjoy the upgrades of the release and still be able to commit scheduled workflows correctly. When the versions of your worker and server do not match, you’ll receive the error above. While our recommendation is to be using the most up to date release, you can always upgrade or revert your designer version either at our Downloads page (current version) or the Previous Releases webpage. To check on the version you’re using, you can navigate in the Designer to the Help >> About menu.
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Question Is it possible to have multiple administrators for a Gallery Collection? Answer Yes, as of v10.1 we have added the ability to add additional administrators to Gallery Collections. In the past, the Collection owner was assigned as the sole administrator. In order to add another user as an administrator, the user must also be an Artisan to the Private Studio from which the app was shared. Please follow the steps below to add an administrator to a Collection:   In the Gallery, click on the Collections button. Click on the Collection you want to add the Administrator. Click on Users, look for the user, and then click on “Collection Admin”.     Once you've added the Admin permission , the user should now be able to add/update any app/workflow within the Collection.
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Recently, we have had a number of questions regarding SSL certificates, how to install them, and how to configure Alteryx Server to use them. While the Alteryx Server Installation and Configuration Guide does cover enabling SSL for Alteryx Server, it doesn’t cover obtaining a certificate, or how to install that certificate so it can be used by the server.   There are a number of tools and methods you can use to obtain a SSL certificate to use with Alteryx Server.  In this article we will be focusing on using OpenSSL to create a Certificate Signing Request (CSR) to send to a Certificate Authority (CA), generating a self-signed certificate, installing the certificate, and configuring Alteryx Server to use the certificate.   Note: If you don’t have OpenSSL installed on your server you can download a precompiled Win32 or Win64 binary from https://slproweb.com/products/Win32OpenSSL.html. Please keep in mind that OpenSSL is not developed, or maintained by Alteryx. That we have no affiliation with the OpenSSL project, or the provider of this precompiled binary. As such feel free to use which ever implementation of OpenSSL you are comfortable with.   Creating a Certificate Signing Request with OpenSSL:   To generate a CSR, open an administrator command prompt on your server and navigate to the directory containing your OpenSSL.exe and configuration file. From there run the following command:   openssl.exe req -config openssl.cfg -out ServerName.csr -new -newkey rsa:2048 -nodes -keyout ServerName.key   This will prompt you to answer a number of questions related to your organization and the server. You can use the included a screenshot for your reference, but keep in mind the responses should be based on your organization and server information.     This command will create two files in the same directory with a .csr and .key extension. These files will need to be provided to your CA in order to have your certificate created. This can be either an internal CA, or a public CA such as; Verisign, GeoTrust, DigiCert, Entrust, StartCom, etc. The CA will provide you with a signed certificate in return as a .crt, .cer, .pem, or .pfx file.   Creating a Self-Signed Certificate with OpenSSL:   You can also use OpenSSL to generate a self-signed certificate. While this isn’t recommended for production environments there maybe a number of reasons why you would want to create one. Some possible reasons include dev or lab environments, and testing to confirm functionality before purchasing a certificate from a public CA. Regardless of your reason you can do so with the following procedure:   Open an administrator command prompt and navigate to your OpenSSL directory. Once there, run these commands:   openssl.exe req -config openssl.cfg -x509 -sha256 -nodes -days 365 -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout ServerName.key -out ServerName.crt openssl.exe pkcs12 -export -out ServerName.pfx -inkey ServerName.key -in ServerName.crt   The first command generates a signed certificate (.crt file) and private key (.key file). The second command creates a combined certificate and key file in a .pfx format from the generated certificate and key. Please keep in mind you will be asked the same or similar questions as you would if you were generating a CSR. Please reference the screenshots below:       Note: As previously stated we do not recommend using self-signed certificates in production environments.   Installing the Certificate:   Once we have received the signed certificate from the CA or generated a self-signed certificate we need to install it. To install the certificate we need to open a Microsoft Management Console (MMC) to access the Certificates snap-in by following these steps:   Click Start and then click Run. In the command line, type MMC and then click OK. In the Microsoft Management Console (MMC), on the File menu, click Add/Remove Snap-in. In the Add Remove Snap-in dialog box, click Add. In the Add Standalone Snap-in dialog box, select Certificates and then click Add. In the Certificates snap-in dialog box, select the Computer account radio button because the certificate needs to be made available to all users, and then click Next. In the Select Computer dialog box, leave the default Local computer: (the computer this console is running on) selected and then click Finish. In the Add Standalone Snap-in dialog box, click Close. In the Add/Remove Snap-in dialog box, click OK.   Next, we need to actually import the certificate. To do this:   Expand Certificates > Personal Right click on certificates under personal Select All Tasks > Import.     This will open the certificate import wizard.     Click Next       Browse to the certificate file provided by your CA, or the pfx file generated in the self-signing instructions Click Next   If you are using a self-signed certificate, or your CA issued a certificate that includes the private key you will be prompted for the password/phrase. Otherwise this step will be skipped by the import wizard.     Enter the password Check the box to mark this key as exportable Click Next   The next screen will ask to confirm where you want to place the certificate. This should have the Certificate store set to ‘Personal’ already.      Set the Certificate store to Personal if needed Click next On the next screen click Finished   If you are installing a self-signed certificate we need to repeat these steps in order to establish the local server as a trusted authority. To do this install the certificate a second time following the same steps as above. Except this time we are going to install it to the Trusted Root Certificate Authorities store instead of the Personal store. You can do this by expanding Trusted Root Certificate Authorities, right clicking on certificates, and choosing All Tasks > Import, or by changing the Certificate store at the end of the import wizard.       Configuring Alteryx Server to Use the Certificate:   At this point you can follow the detailed instructions in the Alteryx Server Installation and Configuration Guide to complete the configuration. Alternatively (and for completeness), you can continue with these simplified instructions.   First you need to collect the certificate thumbprint for the certificate you installed above. You can do this from MMC > Certificates > Personal > Certificates by right clicking on the installed certificate and choosing open. This will open a certificate dialog for the certificate you installed. From there, select the Details tab and find the Thumbprint field. Copy the value and remove all spaces from it (e.g. ‎74d4ca722e2954cd225f9b4697d2fc7f6747194c).     Next, you need to bind http port 443 to the certificate. To do so, open your administrator command prompt again. Then run the following command, making sure to replace the certhash with the thumbprint value you captured:   netsh http add sslcert ipport=0.0.0.0:443 certhash=‎74d4ca722e2954cd225f9b4697d2fc7f6747194c appid={eea9431a-a3d4-4c9b-9f9a-b83916c11c67}     To check that the binding is correct, you can run the following command:   netsh http show sslcert       Note: When renewing an expired or expiring certificate, you will need to delete the current binding (netsh http delete sslcert ipport=0.0.0.0:443), capture the thumbprint of the new certificate, and rebind the certificate using the instructions above.   For the final step, you will need to configure the Gallery service to use SSL. To do this open Alteryx System Settings and click Next until you reach Gallery > General. Once there find the Base Address section and check the box to Enable SSL. Then click Next, Finished, or Done as appropriate to apply the settings change and restart the Alteryx Service.     Note: The URL must also match the name the certificate was issued to. As such, if the certificate was issued to the server's fully qualified domain name (e.g. hostname.domain.tld), your URL needs to match this by using https://hostname.domain.tld/gallery/. If the certificate was issued to just the hostname, you would need to use https://hostname/gallery/. If the URL doesn’t match the certificate the service will fail to start properly.       Applicable versions: Alteryx Server 10.0 & 10.1 Credits:
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For a shared server, the system owner/IT contact should set the memory to no more than (total memory-2G)/(Number of Users). This allows all users to run modules simultaneously without causing the system to go into virtual memory, which significantly slows processing.
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