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Challenge #161: Triangles, Triangles, Triangles

TungThanhHo
8 - Asteroid

my solution with some help from posted solutions

martinding
11 - Bolide
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grazitti_sapna
17 - Castor

Solution to this with great efforts:

 

Sapna Gupta
CammyPhillips
8 - Asteroid
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FinnCharlton
12 - Quasar
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FrederikE
11 - Bolide
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BS_THE_ANALYST
9 - Comet

Was a fun challenge! My interpretation of the problem was that each vertex of the triangle cannot share a longitude or latitude with any other vertex of that same triangle. I think that's the literal definition of non-collinear.

 

For my solution, it actually appeared that the furthest northeastern point and the furthest southeastern point lie on the same longitude. However, after checking the points themselves, this wasn't the case, so that is a valid triangle (non-collinear).

 

Lastly, I was concerned about comparing the different values for the longitudes/latitudes as the precision of a double might not be precise enough to equate two lats/longs. After checking the documentation, the datatype double is accurate up to 15 digits precision. Every data point is within this precision. 

BS_THE_ANALYST_0-1673545993252.png

 

Solution below:

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