Alteryx Designer Knowledge Base

Definitive answers from Designer experts.
It's the most wonderful time of the year - Santalytics 2020 is here! This year, Santa's workshop needs the help of the Alteryx Community to help get back on track, so head over to the Group Hub for all the info to get started!
In life, there are few things black and white. There are gray areas everywhere and the lines that separate can be a little fuzzy. The same holds true for data – especially when it’s human entered. That’s why we have the Fuzzy Match Tool – if your data isn’t clear as day, you can still get value out of your records by matching them to something a little more standardized.
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For most tools that already have “dynamic” in the name, it would be redundant to call them one of the most dynamic tools in the Designer. That’s not the case for Dynamic Input. With basic configuration, the Dynamic Input Tool allows you to specify a template (this can be a file or database table) and input any number of tables that match that template format (shape/schema) by reading in a list of other sources or modifying SQL queries. This is especially useful for periodic data sets, but the use of the tool goes far beyond its basic configuration. To aid in your data blending, we’ve gone ahead and cataloged a handful of uses that make the Dynamic Input Tool so versatile:
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Data blending, transformation and cleansing..oh my! Whether you're looking to apply a mathematical formula to your numeric data, perform string operations on your text fields (like removing unwanted characters), or aggregate your spatial data (among many other things!), the Formula Tool is the place to start.  With the examples provided below, you should be on your way to harnessing the many functions of the Formula Tool:
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This article is part of the Tool Mastery Series, a compilation of Knowledge Base contributions to introduce diverse working examples for Designer Tools. Here we’ll delve into uses of the Input Data Tool on our way to mastering the Alteryx Designer
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If you haven’t used the Run Command Tool just yet, that’s great. It means that whatever your analyses required, we had it covered with basic Designer functionality. But in spite of how great the Designer is, it just can’t do everything. There is a utility on your computer that can do just about anything, however, and it’s the command line. The Run Command Tool pairs the two into a dynamic tag-team duo that can wrestle all the computation you could need into one, integrated, Designer workflow:
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The Append Fields tool adds every row of the source input to every row of the target input as new columns. This is also known as a Cartesian or cross join!
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With the release of 2018.3 comes the long-awaited and highly anticipated Python Tool! This article is a general introduction to using the tool.
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The Join Multiple tool is a combination of the Join and Union tool. It is best used to consolidate a workflow into one tool when you would instead use Multiple Join then Union tools.
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Far more than just a window to your data, the Browse Tool has a catalog of features to best view, investigate, and copy/save data at any checkpoint you place it.  That introspection to your data anywhere in your blending gives valuable feedback that often speeds workflow development and makes it easier to learn tools by readily visualizing their transforms. Be equipped, and browse through the catalog of useful applications below!
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The Multi-Row Formula Tool functions much like the normal Formula Tool but adds the ability to reference multiple rows of data within one expression. Say, for example, someone was on the ground floor of a house and had a Formula Tool. They would only be able to talk to the people also on the ground floor. If they had a Multi-Row Formula Tool, though, they would also be able to talk to the people upstairs, in the attic, and in the basement as well.
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The RegEx tool is kind of like the Swiss Army Knife of parsing in Alteryx; there are a whole lot of ways you can use it to do things faster or more effectively, but even if you just use the blade it's still immensely useful. Sometimes that's all you need, but if you do take the time to figure out how to use a few other tools in that knife, you'll start to see that there isn't much you can't do with it.
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Understanding Join output anchors and when to add a Union tool:  The Join tool anchors are separate subsets of data. You can combine them with a Union tool. The Select functionality of the Join tool applies only to the J anchor, not the R or L anchored data.
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Date/Time data can appear in your data in string formats (text fields) or date formats. The DateTime Tool standardizes and formats such data so that it can be used in expressions and functions from the Formula or Filter Tools (e.g. calculating the number of days that have elapsed since a start date). It can also be used to convert dates in datetime format to strings to use for reporting purposes.
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Did you know the average football game lasts 3 hours and 12 minutes and only amounts to roughly 11 minutes of play? Now, I love trying to eat Doritos through my TV screen as much as the next guy, but for me the highlights are definitely a better watch. The Summarize Tool would probably agree - the most effective communication of your data is the most concise summary of it. Whether it’s concatenating strings for storage, merging reports to have better readability, getting your spatial objects to interact, or even calculating averages and other formulas on groupings of data, the Summarize Tool can reframe your data to be more informative. This article provides a few examples on how.
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The Join Tool is the quintessential tool for data blending within Alteryx.  As such, it is also one of the most widely used tools. The Join Tool allows you to join data together from two different sources in two different ways: by record position and by specific fields. Selecting by record position will attach the two datasets together where it will match up each record by the position it is in. Thus record 1 of the left dataset will be in the same row as record 1 on the right in the J output and so on. If one dataset from either side has more records than the other those records will not be joined and they will be placed in there corresponding right or left output (L or R). Joining by specific field will match records up based on a specific field or multiple fields. This article goes into how that option works in more depth and detail. I highly recommend it as a read, as it covers frequent behaviors of the tool that you might run into.
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The  Filter Tool , which is part of the  Preparation tool category , separates your data into 2 output streams, True and False, based on a basic filter or custom expression.
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Sometimes you look at the steaming pile of data before you and wonder how you’ll ever get it in the form you need. Every option seems to require a great deal of manual labor, and as a lazy– er that is, as a data blending professional, that is simply something you will not abide.
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Quick navigation for the Tool Mastery Series!
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This is the place to be if you are trying to learn how to download data from your Amazon S3 onto Alteryx Designer, or uploading data from Alteryx Designer to your Amazon S3 account. 
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Fact: workflows are the best. Look it up. They’re all about getting things done and, with hundreds of tools and the ability to integrate external processes , there’s no shortage of things you can get done. We know that there are some areas of analytics that require a little extra firepower, however, and that’s why you can leverage your workflows in apps and macros for added functionality.
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