Don't forget to register for our panel discussion with Dean Stoecker, Amy Holland, and Mark Frisch occurring next Wednesday, June 1!

2022-05-26 Updates: Email: If you're not seeing emails be delivered from the Community, please check your spam and mark the Community emails as not junk. Thank you for your patience.

Alteryx Designer Knowledge Base

Definitive answers from Designer experts.
When using the Intersect tool to compare the same spatial information between an MRR file and a GRD file, the MMR is showing an offset, when the overlap should be 100%
View full article
Gathering and using spatial data requires a way to record the location of whatever is being observed
View full article
Red x's in the Experian dataset when using the Allocate Tool.
View full article
PopStats does not work in Alteryx Designer versions above 2020.4
View full article
AlteryxSpatialPluginsEngine.dll could not be loaded: The specified module could not be found
View full article
Suppose you have a datetime stamp in a dataset for the timezone where you are. This dataset includes data for locations in timezones other than the one you're in and you want to convert your datetime stamp to reflect the local time zones of the locations in your data.
View full article
A part of the Spatial Tools Category, the Distance Tool calculates how far apart spatial objects are.
View full article
Clustering analysis has a wide variety of use cases, including harnessing spatial data for grouping stores by location, performing customer segmentation or even insurance fraud detection. Clustering analysis groups individual observations in a way that each group (cluster) contains data that are more similar to one another than the data in other groups. Included with the Predictive Tools installation, the K-Centroids Cluster Analysis Tool allows you to perform cluster analysis on a data set with the option of using three different algorithms; K-Means, K-Medians, and Neural Gas. In this Tool Mastery, we will go through the configuration and outputs of the tool.
View full article
One of the perennial challenges of creating high-quality maps is working with data sets where the spatial data is too spread out to make a useful map. The general solution for this challenge is to create a Map Book. A Map Book is a series of maps that show a subset of the data at a more detailed resolution. This article demonstrates methods for creating a Map Book in Alteryx.\n  
View full article
Customers using pre 2019.4 Designer and Insights Data need to update to the Mapbox maps or they will see this issue with Digital Globe maps.
View full article
This article is part of the CS Macro Development Series. The goal of this series is to communicate tips, tricks, and the thought process that goes into developing good, dynamic macros.
View full article
Don’t know the area of your polygon? Need the length of your line? Do you want your spatial object’s X and Y coordinates? Don’t Panic! The Spatial Info tool can translate all that information and more!
View full article
Imagine this – you’re on vacation. You’re on a sandy beach where the sun has been relentless all day. It’s hot and you need something to cool you off. Ice cream would be perfect! The Find Nearest tool can help!
View full article
The Report Map tool allows the user to define theme settings/ranges and to modify the size, icon, and color of the display for each range, and this can be done rather easily. First, in the Map tool on the Data tab, pick which column you would like to theme off in the Thematic Field selection area:                            Once this column is selected, go to the Layers tab in the Map tool and expand the layer options for your theme layer. Click on the Theme and options will appear on the right. For the purpose of defining your own theme settings, you will want the Tile Method to be on Unique Value, which gives the Specific Values area.                             The Specific Values area is where you list what you want to theme on. For this example, we are theming off the DMA_Name so you would enter each of the DMA names you would like to theme. If you have a lot of ranges, you could also use a Summarzie tool in your module and  Group By your theme column, thus giving you a list of your theme values. Run the module once to populate the Browse tool and you can then click and hold on the first row and drag down to the row of your choosing, selecting them all. Ctrl+C will copy the rows and you can paste them into the Specific Values area using Ctrl+V                             Once the values are entered, click on Refresh and a layer option will show up for each of the theme values you set.                           Now that the theme values are layers, you can go to the Style option under each layer and change the Point Style , bring in a Custom Point , change the  Size , Color , modify the Outline Color and Outline Size .                           If you don't define all the values that are contained in the data you are bringing thru, the Map tool also provides options on what to do with these.                           This can also be done with number ranges with a few small changes. For Tile Method , choose Manual Tile . Enter in the cutoff for each range that you would like to be able to theme.                          Hit Refresh and the new layers for the theme ranges will be displayed, allowing you to modify each one. Also note that layers are created for the ranges below and above what you specify in the Cutoff Values area.                         
View full article
Copy:  In a Browse tool, under the map tab, right click on any point on the map.  The Latitude and Longitude for that location will be displayed.  If you click on “Copy Point …” you will have copied that Latitude Longitude value to your clipboard. Paste:  Right click on the module canvas, select “Paste” and a Text Input tool will be added to your module, with the values of your copied point already populated in the tool.
View full article
Buffer – This tool was designed to work primarily with Lines and Polygons, but is effective with Points as well Trade Area – Only works with Points.  If you create a trade area around a polygon, the Trade Area tool will use the polygon’s centroid as the basis for creating the trade area.  The Trade Area tool should only be used with point spatial objects. Non-Overlapping – Points Only.  To create non-overlapping buffers around Point spatial objects, use the Trade Area tool instead of the Buffer tool, and check the “Eliminate Overlap” checkbox.  It is not possible to create a non-overlapping trade area from line or polygon spatial objects.    
View full article
The purpose of this process is to demonstrate the use of the bounding rectangle as a means of processing spatial data. 
View full article
In its spatial tools, Alteryx includes an option to create a convex hull polygon from a series of points. However, depending on the type of analysis requested, it can be more ideal to create a concave hull instead. An example of this would be the need to group customer points into trade areas thematically based on store location. If the standard method of convex hull polygon creation were used, it would be possible to create polygons that overlap, which would not be the desired outcome. A demostration of this is shown below. Module attached. Example: To avoid this, one can first project non-overlapping trade areas from the points and spatially combine them to eliminate the overlap. To then remove the excess area projected, the object can be trimmed to the original convex hull boundaries. To further process and remove the resulting holes, spatial generalization can then be used.
View full article
The addition of a reference map can bring your report to another level of utility.  This is a technique that is often used when a module is developed to produce a multitude of maps; each zoomed-in upon a small area.  For users who may be unfamiliar with the area displayed in the primary map view, a reference map provides a rapid means of orientation. The key to creating a reference map is making use of the bounding rectangle sourced from your primary map.  The bounding rectangle will be used as a display feature (layer) in the reference map.
View full article
How To: Combine Date Ranges with a Macro This module (and embedded batch macro) will provide a comprehensive timeline or date range(s) using multiple, overlapping date ranges.       The macro converts date ranges into spatial objects in order to use the spatial functions in Alteryx to group overlapping or adjacent ranges. This ensures that ranges A and C get are grouped together when A and C do not overlap but both A and C overlap range B (and so forth for larger chains of ranges).           It also allows for “jumping” a user-determined number of days in order to combine regions that do not overlap but are within a specified number of days of one another.      
View full article
Business Problem: Thematic maps are often used to display data geographically with colored or shaded themes, but sometimes users wish to see the data differently. For this purpose, dot density mapping has become a frequently requested feature for map rendering in Alteryx. Dot density creation is possible with the inclusion of the spatial function within the formula tool. This function, ST_Random Point, will randomly disperse a point within a given polygon. Utilizing this tool, anyone can create a macro to produce the data required to generate a dot density map. Actionable Results: Easily create dot density thematic maps Overview: It can often be convenient to view thematic maps as clustered points. This type of visual output is a logical and accurate representation of data occurring in a non-continuous distribution. Vertical: Any Key Tools Used: Formula Tool (ST_Random Point spatial function), Generate Rows Required Input: As inputs, the Dot Density macro requires two fields: geography with an associated value and a configuration of the number of dots per value. Determining the appropriate number of dots per value may require some trial and error to produce desirable results. Knowing the min, max, and median values associated with the base geographies would help you to determine and optimal dots per value. This coupled with the size of dots on the map will greatly affect the aesthetic of the mapping.  
View full article