Alteryx Designer Knowledge Base

Definitive answers from Designer experts.
Don't forget to submit your entry for the Excellence Awards by October 30! | Need more information about the program? Check out the blog here
Question If I have a workflow that creates a set of data by region, how can I group the data by region and then send each region's data separately to each of the region's Vice President, all within one workflow? Answer There are several ways to do this, depending on what form you want the reports to take. The attached workflow, created in 10.6, gives you three examples as described below. Please note that you will need to populate the second Text Input Tool and the "From" in the Email Tool with valid email addresses in order to test.   1. Include Data as a Table within the Body of Email If you are dealing with a small set of records and columns, this might be your best bet. This approach will insert a table into the body of the email, giving the recipient immediate access to the data without having to open an attachment.   The email will look similar to this:     2. Create Flat Files and Attach to Emails This option is best if you simply need to send specific datasets to specific recipients and the report doesn't require any formatting. Here, you are simply creating files names based on Region, writing out the data by Region (using the "Take File/Table Name From Field" option in the Output Data Tool), and then summarizing the recipient and file name data so that only one email is sent per group.     The Excel files will look like this:      3. Create a Formatted Excel Table and Attach to Email This one is similar to the previous workflow, except we are creating a formatted table using the Table Tool, and then writing out the table to Excel using the Render Tool, in order to keep the formatting. In the Render Tool, we are using the "Group Data Into Separate Reports" feature.   In this example, the Excel files will look like this:     I hope you will find this useful for your use case. Thank you for reading!  
View full article
Question Is it possible to have Alteryx notify me when a workflow kicks off/completes? Answer You bet!   You can set up a workflow event to send an email either before or after a workflow runs. If choosing after, there are multiple options to choose from depending on what you want.   To set up the Event:   Click anywhere on the blank workflow canvas to open the Workflow Configuration menu. From there, click over to the Events tab and make sure the "Enable Events" box is checked:   Click the Add button and select Send Email:   When the next dialog box comes up, select when you want the Event to run:   Before Run: sends email before beginning the run of the workflow. Can be helpful when the Scheduler queue is backed up and you want to know when the workflow starts After Run: when the workflow completes regardless of success/failure After Run With Errors: Only sends the email if the workflow fails due to an error After Run Without error: Only sends email if the workflow completes without any errors. Disabled: No emails will send until enabled   Finally, fill out the rest of the information. The most common issue with the remaining set up is the SMTP settings. It is often necessary to check with IT to ensure you have the correct information entered:   The subject and body sections are auto filled with commonly desired information including workflow name (Subject) and the output log (Body), You can add/edit the items included to suit your needs for each event.
View full article
 There's a nifty little trick in Excel using the =REPT function that creates an in-cell bar chart.  Let's start with a simple set of numerical data:     Using the expression:     produces an in-cell chart that looks like this if you change the B2:B4 to a Wingdings font:     I divided the numerical data in A2:A4 by 5 to avoid getting a chart that was too big.  Alternatively, we can use the expression:     And used an 8-pt Arial font to produce a bar chart without dividing Qty.      Neat-o!  I wonder how I can do this using Alteryx.    To make a chart that looks like the one with the Wingdings font above, we'll have to refer to a unicode character table. We can't change the font to Wingdings, so we'll have to find the '■' character in the unicode character table.  We have to scroll WAY DOWN to find it (it's Unicode number U+25A0).     Let's bring in our data using a Text Input Tool:     and connect a Formula Tool followed by a Browse:       Where the formula expression uses the function PADLEFT:     Our result looks like the one from Excel:     Of course, we didn't have use a Unicode character.  We could have used '|', similar the Excel example using the 8-pt Arial font.     Let's elaborate on this a bit.  In our example, we would like to have a quick visual that stands out if [Qty] < 60.  In the Formula tool expression, we'll use a conditional statement so a quantity less than 60 will appear as '▣' (U+25A3):       The results look like this:     Let's take one final we could create a visual, one where the chart only has a single '■' positioned relatively.  In other words, '■' for a quantity of 100 would appear further to the right than the row with a quantity of 55.       This gives a chart column that looks like this:    
View full article
One of the perennial challenges of creating high-quality maps is working with data sets where the spatial data is too spread out to make a useful map. The general solution for this challenge is to create a Map Book. A Map Book is a series of maps that show a subset of the data at a more detailed resolution. This article demonstrates methods for creating a Map Book in Alteryx.  
View full article
A common use case related to mapping is creating a map of customers that are color-coded, for example, according to which sister store they purchased from or which branch they bank at. Typically, a thematic map is thought of as a map of polygons shaded by a range of values. But in this case, we are shading points according to unique values.   In order to create a map like this, you simply need a file of points and a field that has groups of unique values, again, such as a store or a branch ID. In the example below, I simply thematically mapped our sample set of stores by county, which allows the audience to easily determine which county each store is in. This would be very similar to the use case of which store or branch the customer is associated with.   Here's how you do it:   After connecting your dataset to the Report Map tool, configure the following screens as shown: Choose the field to thematically map Select the 'Theme' option under the point layer your are mapping and choose the options as shown below  After a few aesthetic adjustments, the map looks like this:     And the workflow looks like this, which is also attached to this post (created in 10.5).     Worth Noting: This type of map does not lend itself to large groups of values. In these cases, there are many colors used, and due to the number of unique values, many shades of those colors. This makes it difficult to distinguish one group from the next.   Happy mapping!
View full article
When creating reports, whether they contain maps, tables, charts, titles, etc., there will come a point when you will need to organize the layout of these objects. In Alteryx, the way to do this is somewhat similar to the old Slide or Tile puzzles. Remember this? You have to create rows and/or columns, and arrange the objects (tiles) in the order that you desire. The good thing is that with Alteryx you have complete control over what goes where, so you kind of get to cheat and only have to use the up and down arrows to get the objects where you want them. Now granted, it's not quite that easy as you have to consider things like spacing, page size, image size, alignment and borders, but after a bit of trial and error, you should be able to get things laid out just the way you want!   Attached is a simple workflow (created in 10.5) that arranges real-world objects, such as titles, logos, charts, etc. Take a look at the workflow and see how we have joined the objects by record position (as opposed to specific fields) and created layouts for each group of objects. This allows you to stack the groups appropriately - vertically or horizontally - and then finally put all of the pieces together at the end.   Tools used: Report Text Join Multiple Layout Render                      Thanks for playing!  
View full article
I’m proud to show off some of the great features of the Interactive Chart tool . Using the new Interactive Chart tool, users can immediately validate the configuration options selected to ensure the desired chart is created. There is no longer a need to re-run the workflow to see changes reflected in the chart.
View full article
Interested in getting an email notification whenever a workflow is executed and fails?
View full article
  The Task I remember vividly many years ago when I was tasked by my former boss at a previous company to create trade area maps for each one of our office supply stores. At the time, we had roughly 1,200 stores. I only had MapInfo to work with and no programming skills to fall back on. Needless to say, I was a little distraught.    It didn't take me long to realize that this feat, as far as I was concerned, could not and would not be completed manually. So, a crash course in MapBasic programming was in order. After a lot of studying, a fair amount of pain and hours upon hours of struggle, I was able to create a MapBasic program that would produce these maps in an automated fashion.   Fast forward 4 years and something amazing happened – I was introduced to Alteryx!   After significantly less studying, pain and struggling, I was able to create a workflow which could to do the same thing, except this time produce three map views for each store. Not only was I able to create the workflow without programming, saving me countless hours, Alteryx produced each map in significantly less time. So, I would run the workflow before leaving for the day and come back in the morning with the nearly 4,000 PDFs waiting for me! We then decided to produce two additional thematics for each store, so now we are talking nearly 12,000 maps. You can only imagine the time savings!   How is this done? The attached workflow (shown below - created in 10.1) is the basis for doing just that. The Grouping function within the Report Map tool (also shown below) is all that is required to create this automation. In this workflow, I want to create a map for each store with each store’s 15 minute drive time and customers. I also want all of the competitors to show up no matter which store is shown. In order to achieve this, I have simply configured the workflow so that the store number is in the Grouping Field for the first three layers previously mentioned, and left the Grouping Field blank for the competitors layer.         Want a separate file for each map? In the Render Tool (illustration below): Make sure to choose a specific output file type in the Output Mode Choose a name and location for the files Check the 'Group Data into Separate Reports' box Select the field to group on (typically 'Group') Choose how you want to modify the file name for each map     As a result, you will see a file created for each map:       Requirements: Each layer must have a common field (Store Number in this case). The Field type of the common field to group by must be the exact same (Int16 in this case) - No mixing of Int16 with Int64 or V_String with String, for instance. Things to Consider: Only one object from each of the layers that you are grouping by will show up on each map (unless you have multiple records with the same ID). So for example, other stores will not show up on the same map, even if they are within the map view. You can add these in as a seperate layer and not group it if you want those within the map view to show up on each map. Zoom to layer – Select appropriate layer to zoom to in each map (drive time boundary in this case). A field called ‘Group’ will flow through the workflow after the Report Map tool, which you can use for map titles, for example.   Please feel free to comment or ask questions, and thanks for reading!
View full article
The addition of page numbers to a report is quite simple, there are two steps: First, add a Text tool immediately before your Render tool.  In the Text tool, under the Special Tags drop-down select the Current Page option.  The example below is a more elaborate example employing the annotation text “page” and “of” and the special tags to display the current page and total number of pages in the document. Secondly, in your Render tool, check the Footer checkbox, and select the “Text” field as the field to display for the Footer.   Done!
View full article
Question Is the Alteryx Help available in languages other than English? Answer Yes! Currently the Alteryx Help file is translated in French, German, and Portuguese (Brazil). For the latest, click here:  http://help.alteryx.com/current/index.htm#HelpLanguages.htm   You will also find the Alteryx Server Quick Start Guide in the same languages.
View full article
When creating a finance report with the Alteryx reporting tools, you might want to annotate numbers a certain way. This article will show you how!
View full article
Many skunk works type of products are never really seen by the public eye (such as the Boeing Joint Strike Fighter prototype).  The beauty of being a part of a software company that has both desktop and web products is that we have the ability to play with and show off our prototypes to the general public.  Enter interactive visualizations within Alteryx!   (NOTE: The methods described in this article and the linked blog posts serve the sole purpose to display the flexibility of Alteryx and there is no current or future plan to further develop or productize this functionality.)   The image you see above was directly pulled from an Alteryx output.  You may or may not have read the blog of our CTO, Ned Harding (If you haven't, I highly recommend subscribing!).  His recent posts revolve around a topic that has been brought up quite often in the Alteryx circles, reporting and visualizations within Alteryx.   In these articles, Ned displays a method to incorporate HTML5 and Javascript into a few macros with incredible results.  The first is a more static but visually pleasing output, while the second is a Public Gallery app that displays the use of interactive output.  Both are very interesting displays of the two technologies working in tandem to help the user better understand their data. Check it out, test it out, and visit the links to the Public Gallery within the blog.   Part 1: Alteryx: JSON Data Output   Part 2: Alteryx: HTML5 Visualizations   Part 3: Alteryx: Interactive HTML Visualizations
View full article
In this post, a user asked if you can merge cells in the Table Tool like you can in excel. There are lots of ways you can get creative with the Table Tool, for example you can have your report span across the page in multiple columns as described here or you can add totals to your data to add to your report or create headers and sub-headers as described here.    So, how do you merge cells using the Table Tool itself? You can merge cells by nesting a table inside another table:   Tables can be nested more than one deep, you could start off with city, roll up to region, and then to state:    To clean up the doubled up header rows that are created when nesting tables like that, deselect "show column headings" in the Table Tools' settings:       .... and create the header row in a separate Table Tool. In this example, we are also changing the background color and making the font bigger, and changing the wording to "Region" for the Region column:      Lastly, there should also be subtotals for each region.   As with anything in Alteryx, there are different ways of doing this, they could be added as described in   this post, or the process used to create the headers can be used. First, the data is summed to create totals, then the totals are put into tables grouped by region:       Lastly, the table snippets are combined in a Layout Tool using the "Vertical Merge Contents to Line Up Table Columns" option:      Also see the attached v2018.1 workflow for the complete example. 
View full article