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Alteryx Designer Knowledge Base

Definitive answers from Designer experts.
The partnership between Alteryx and Tableau is becoming stronger and stronger, and the seamless effortless integration has been made easier through the Publish to Tableau Server Tool. This article demonstrates the use of the Publish to Tableau Server tool, available on the Alteryx Analytics Gallery.
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Issue    During run time of workflow, the following error is received:    Error: Input Data (1): Error SQLExecute: [Simba][Athena] (1040) An error has been thrown from the AWS Athena client. Athena Error No: 99, HTTP Response Code: 1759505392, Error Message: Unable to connect to endpoint [Execution ID: e7fe279d-f39b-4872-b37d-8ad49d49f3f5]   Environment   Alteryx Designer Amazon Athena Environment Windows Operating System Amazon Athena ODBC Driver (found here)   Cause   In version 1.0.3 and greater of the ODBC Driver, Result Set Streaming is enabled by default which has extra requirements. More info on the requirements here.   Solution - Connection String (DSN-less) If connecting via a Connection String: Add UseResultsetStreaming=0 to your connection string Example string:  odbc:Driver={Simba Athena ODBC Driver};AwsRegion=[Region];S3OutputLocation=[S3Path];AuthenticationType=IAM Profile;AWSProfile=[YourProfileName];UseResultsetStreaming=0 Use this string with your standard tools (Input Data, Output Data) or with a Connect In-DB Tool. Solution B - DSN Connection  If you are connecting to your Amazon Athena environment with a DSN connection (via ODBC Admin): Open up ODBC Data Source Administrator  Find your Athena connection and select it Hit "Configure..." Hit "Advanced Options..." Uncheck the "Use Resultset Streaming" box Hit OK to save the Advanced Options Hit OK again to save your connection  
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Having trouble reading or writing Microsoft Access files? No worries - Client Services is here to help!
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Connecting to Hadoop HDFS/Hive/Impala/Spark with Alteryx Designer.
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  We get quite a few requests asking how to add the current date to Excel spreadsheet file names. The difference in adding information to your file name in Excel and other output configurations is that you have to use the Reporting tools for Excel to accept the new file name.   Why would I have to use the Reporting tools, you ask? Simply put, Excel thinks that when you are adding a prefix or suffix to the file name that you are stating that additional information is the “Sheet Name” and not appending the file name from the Output Tool. The Render tool in the Reporting tab on your palette basically tricks Excel into thinking that you are creating a separate report and is able to append the date.   In order to add the date to the file name you will connect these tools to your workflow in the order, you see below.      In the Formula Tool, create a new field that is a String type.  Go to the DateTime functions and add the DateTimeToday() expression. No configuration of the expression is necessary.      The Table tool will allow you to Group By this new field. In the GroupBy Configuration, choose the Date field you created in the Formula. In the Per Column Configuration, uncheck the new field. This will allow you to group by the new field name in the Render Tool and still remove it from the data so that your new field does not appear in your report.          Use the Render Tool to output your Excel spreadsheet with today’s date in the file name.   Output Mode - Choose a Specific Output File. Output File - Specify the Excel 2007 Spreadsheet (xlsx) and point to where you would like to save the documents. The file name you specify will be replaced with the date in step 5 below. You will then check the box that says Group Data into Separate Reports. Field to Group on - You will choose your new field that you created. Modify Filename By – Replacing Filename With Group. Report Data – You will choose Table and can leave the rest as defaults.  
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When creating reports within Alteryx, you can name Excel tabs by specifying a column to use in the Layout tool. This is done in a 3 step process. Step One:   Choose your grouping column; below, the Table tool is being used and [DMA_Name] is being used for the Group By field. This would also apply with the Charting and Map tools.         Step Two:   In the Layout tool, change the Layout Mode to Each Group Of Records. Next, choose the column you would like to Group By;  for the example we will use [DMA_Name]. Next, change the Orientation to Vertical with Section Breaks. By doing this, the Section Name option will appear at the bottom of the tool configuration and allow you to choose the column you would like to use to name the Excel tabs.       Step Three:   Update the Render tool to create an Excel spreadsheet. In our example, each of the Excel tabs was named for the DMAs contained in the data.           Keep on reporting!
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A user posted on the Forum that the ampersand character (&) was causing an error when importing a series of KML files. The fix? Have a prior Alteryx process replace this character with the word 'and' within all KML files without ruining the rest of the file. To accomplish: Pull in an Input Tool and set the file type to .csv with no delimiter (designation is \0). In the Input Data Source portion, use the wildcard (*) to pull in all of your text files (using KML in the example). For the option Output File Name as Field, select File Name Only. Use a Formula Tool to update the text within the files. Output each file individually with one Output Tool, making sure to set the output to dynamically update based on your file name field. The process is fairly straightforward and should help resolve any text or character issues that may be an issue. For an example, please see the attached workflow.
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Is it possible to append to a YXDB instead of having to read in the whole thing, union the new records, and then re-create it? The short answer is, No, but you can accomplish this with SQLITE.
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You may have a use case whereby you have a large dataset and you want to output it to separate excel files. However, in each of these excel files you would like to apply a template format.
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How do I output to an Excel template file? It is possible to output your data to an existing Excel document that already has modified formats and column names. For example, the below Excel file has existing data in the first 4 rows. If you wanted to add addresses to this file while keeping the first 4 rows, the first step would be to highlight the area you want to write to. If you don’t know the exact length/width of your data, I would recommend going large: Once you have your desired area highlighted, right-click and choose the Define Name… option: A popup box will appear, enter in a name of your choosing and click OK: You also need to make sure that the sheet you are saving to doesn’t contain any spaces in the sheet name. Once verified, save the template and close out: Below is an example of the sample data that will be added to the above template: In Alteryx, use a Input tool to point to the data you would like to use to update the template file: In the Output, you will want to choose the template file, which will cause the below message to appear, choose yes to overwrite: When saving to Excel, the below window will popup, enter the name you used for the range you highlighted in the template file: After clicking OK, the Output configuration area will populate. Change the Output Options to Delete Data & Append: You can now run the module. Once the module is finished, you can open the updated template file, you should see your previously formatted rows/columns plus the new data you wanted to append: If you set a format to the range you named (color, text style, bold, etc), Excel will keep it so that the data you are writing to the file will appear with the specified format.
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If you have two or more files, different structure, and you would like to output each file into a separate tabs in an Excel spreadsheet. You could use the table tool to create snippets and the Layout tool to create sections breaks. Bring in your files using the Input tool and connect them to Table tools to create the snippets.  Finally, Join them by record position. The Layout Tool properties should look as follows.  Select Vertical with Section Breaks for the Orientation setting. The output will show each file in a separate tab:
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If you have a file that you want to output to separate Excel files you can first create the desired file path with the  Formula   tool  and then utilize the  Output   tool  to change the entire path.
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Multiple files can easily be combined into a single Excel file containing multiple worksheets (or tabs).  The format of the files do not need to be the same; they can be completely different.    In the example attached to this article, two files, a Customer .csv file and a Store .xlsx file, are output to a single Excel spreadsheet (.xlsx format) with one tab for Customer and another for Store. These files contain different data elements and have different layouts.    The first step is to create a new field in each dataset (e.g.: 'TabName') and set the expression to the name you want each worksheet to have. In the attached example, 'TabName' is set to 'Customer' and 'Store,' respectively for each dataset.    When you get ready to output your data, use an output tool for each dataset and configure them in the same way.  The file format is 'Microsoft Excel (*.xlsx)' and when prompted to select a worksheet for the output, select 'Sheet1'. Check the 'Take File/Table Name' checkbox located at the bottom of the configuration window. Select 'Change File/Table Name' in the dropdown and under 'Field Containing Name or Part of File Name' enter 'TabName'.  You probably don't want TabName in your final output, so uncheck the 'Keep Field in Output' checkbox.   
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Ever have to output tables of differeing schemas to the same Excel workbook? Ever need to output to different tabs? This article covers your bases with the cunning use of Reporting tools! Also included are links to other helpful "outputting to Excel" Knowledgebase Articles.
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  One of the great things about Alteryx is the ability to have multiple geography types (points, lines, regions) all contained within the same record.     However, when exporting map layers to MapInfo Tab file format, a decision has to be made of which spatial field to keep.  What if you want all of them?!     Not to worry! The Transpose tool will save the day!     To configure the Transpose tool all fields will need to be selected under the Key Fields except for the spatial fields, they will be selected under the Data Fields.       Just note that there are now 2 fields for the radius. RadiusSize will correspond to the first trade area (row 2) and RadiusSize2 will correspond to the second trade area (row 3).   Now, more importantly all the spatial objects exist in one field (the Value field) and can now easily be exported to MapInfo.      Note: this methodology will also work for ESRI shapefiles, however, all the spatial objects must be of the same type. All points, all polygons...   (An example workflow is attached. This workflow was created in Alteryx 10.0)
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How to save your predictive model.
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Have you ever tried writing to multiple tabs within the same workflow and have received an error? This article is for you!
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Question Can an excel template be updated if the incoming information is not in a block form?  Say I want to fill in a form from an existing list into something like this template.       Answer This is a question we get from time to time. There are a few options on how to do this, the below provided by
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SPSS Output   Overview   When working with SPSS, values can have both a Text label and a numeric representation of the categories (equivalent of string factors in R). Columns can also have an encoded name ex. Q_1 and a longer descriptive name that maps Q_1 to the original question that was asked (closest thing in R is the data frame attribute on the column).   Alteryx reads .sav files and loads either the numeric representation or the textual representation of values based on the user’s selection. It also reads the variable labels into the Alteryx Field Description.  When writing .sav output, Alteryx will write either the text or the numeric values (depending on what was used in the workflow) as well as the SPSS variable labels which were displayed in the description field. However sometimes to maintain the integrity of the whole SPSS file, clients will want the value labels, value levels, and variable labels to appear in the output file. For these cases, using the Alteryx tools and a few lines of R code (while leveraging the thousands of R packages on CRAN) wrapped in a macro gives us the needed functionality. Attached is a macro which will write the data, variable & value labels back into SPSS.     Macro Process In this section, we will explain the R code logic that is specific to this macro. You can get an introduction to writing custom R code in Alteryx here.      Before we can do anything, we will need to pass the data to the tools inside the macro (more details on macros here). The raw numeric data should be connected to the D input of the macro. In addition, and because the data frames created in R don’t contain the Field Description data, we need to pass Field Description values to the M input (M for Metadata) of the macro. We’re using the Field Info Tool to extract the description into the rows and send it to the macro. With that done we can now look inside the macro.   Inside the Macro       Inside the macro, we are using the R Tool to contain the main functionality. We connect it to the Interface tools (Macro Inputs, File Browse, Action Tool) to get the data, metadata, and output file path from the user. Finally, we’re using the API tool to pass a message back to the user in the Alteryx Execution Messages.   The R Tool contains the code to properly format the input data and write it out to the .sav file. The majority of the work is already done for us in the ‘sjmisc' package from CRAN (R users know that most of the time they can find a package that does what they want). This package, among other features, implements reading and writing .sav files with both variable and value labels. We will first check if the package is not already installed and we’ll attempt to install it.   This workflow installs the additional sjmisc package. To avoid package version and dependency issues, it is possible to use Microsoft R Client as the base R. More details here.   if(!require(sjmisc)){ install.packages("sjmisc") require(sjmisc) }   If you would like to install the package separately you can use the R install packages App from the Alteryx Gallery.   filePath <- "c:\\temp\\outputRAlteryx.sav" inputData <- read.Alteryx("#1", mode="data.frame") ColumnLabels <- as.vector(read.Alteryx("#2", mode="data.frame")$Description)   Within the R code we also define a static ‘filepath ‘ pointing to where the output data should be written. The Action Tool that we previously mentioned will update this filepath to the one chosen by the user while at the same time correctly escaping the backslashes to work in R.   inputData <- read.Alteryx("#1", mode="data.frame") ColumnLabels <- as.vector(read.Alteryx("#2", mode="data.frame")$Description)   We then read the data that we pass to the macro from input ‘#1’ into an R data frame. In this case we are depending on R’s default behavior of transforming text to factors to get the Value encodings for all columns ex Male(1), Female(2). In addition, we read the metadata from input ‘#2’ into R. The sjmisc function, set_label, that applies the variable names to the data frame expects the variable names to be passed as an object of type vector. To make it work, we have to convert the Description column of the data frame we’re reading in into a vector with the as.vector() base R function. For more details about ‘sjmisc’, you can find the documentation here.   labeledData <- sjmisc::set_label(inputData,ColumnLabels) sjmisc::write_spss(labeledData,filePath)   Finally we label inputData with the labels we just created and we store the result in the labeledData dataframe and then write it to the user’s filepath using the sjmisc’s write_spss function.   MessageOut <- paste("file written to: ",filePath) names(MessageOut) <- "Output File Path" write.Alteryx(MessageOut, 1)   We also pass the filepath as a message to the R Tool output to be displayed to the user.     Edit: It was brought to our attention that the macro has an issue writing out text columns that are longer than 120 characters. Unfortunately this is a defect in the underlying R package. As a workaround for now, the macro was modified to trim all text fields to 120 characters. Please keep this in mind when writing out data.   Mandatory Note: This macro and sample code were developed by the authors as a proof of concept to show what's possible. This is not a production-ready macro and is not supported by Alteryx. Do ask questions on this thread - BUT use at your own risk!   WriteSPSSWithLabels_sjlabelled.yxzp has been updated from using the R package sjmisc because the set_label command has been deprecated from sjmisc and is now in sjlabelled.
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