community
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Alteryx Designer Knowledge Base

Definitive answers from Designer experts.
** Update ** With the release of 2019.3 the email tool now has the ability to accept email authentication which opens the doors for sending email through Gmail and other web-based email services. Check out this post on how to send email through Gmail using Alteryx.   There have been a couple instances lately where users have wanted to use the Email tool to send email notifications as part of their workflow but run into issues because their email service is web based like Gmail or Hotmail.   Unfortunately the current Alteryx Email tools don’t support email from an online provider.    However, there is still a way to send email from Alteryx with a web based email.  It’ll require the use of the Event tab or the Run Command tool and the installation of a third party tool.  In this example a tool called SendEmail is used (Alteryx does not recommend or endorse this tool, it happened to be free and worked).   From the Events tab or the Run Command tool enter in the command that executes the tool then in the arguments section add in the tags that are required for the particular email tool.   Events Tab:           Run Command tool:         There is another option in this post in the Ideas section by
View full article
Quick navigation for the Tool Mastery Series!
View full article
This article details different methods for connecting to an Oracle database from Alteryx. 
View full article
The Input Data Tool is where it all starts in the Designer. Sure, you can bring in webscraped or API data with the Download Tool (master it here ) and our prebuilt Connector Tools , but the tool that makes it a breeze to grab data from your most used file formats and databases is the Input Data Tool.
View full article
CReW Macro Support The CReW macros are a useful collection of tools built by a third party that enhance the functionality of Alteryx Designer.   The CReW Runner macros (Runner, Conditional Runner and List Runner) are the only CReW macros supported by Alteryx, but for Alteryx Designer ONLY. These macros are not supported when used on Alteryx Server or Alteryx Designer + Scheduler.   Prerequisites Product - Alteryx Designer Version 10.0+ Product - CReW macro package (third party) Please note that only the Runner macros are supported by Alteryx on Alteryx Designer only. The other macros that are part of the package are Community supported.   Known Issue There is a "known" issue with workflows using CReW Runner macros on Designer 2019.3.2.15763 causing the Runner macro to crash. This issue was resolved in 2019.3.5.17947.   Additional Resources Blog article - CReW macro pack 2016 Q2 release
View full article
  ******************* Update 10/16/2019 Tips + Tricks is at Inspire Europe ! We added some exciting 2019.3 tips & tricks to our book for this occasion. New version is attached.   ***************************   Thanks to everyone that joined us in Nashville for our 2019 Tips and Tricks tour and special thanks to everyone who submitted tips for our Tips + Tricks Book.   Enclosed you will find 91 pages full of Tips + Tricks that will help you save clicks in Alteryx.  The Tips and Tricks book covers our fan favorite tips for saving time when developing workflows and our best tips for organization. Utilize the book to learn everything from workflow design to organization, optimization, to our best time savers.    We hope to see you all at our next Tips and Tricks session.       @MargaritaW , @JessicaS  & @HenrietteH  Your Customer Support Engineering Team  
View full article
Use the Google BigQuery Input tool to query a table from Google BigQuery and read it into  Designer ...
View full article
OneDrive is a file hosting and synchronization service operated by Microsoft. You can connect to a OneDrive instance in Alteryx with the OneDrive Input tool and the OneDrive Output tool.
View full article
This article describes and explains the outputs of the Decision Tree Tool.
View full article
How To: Change Date Type Coming Out of Date Interface Tool to Match In-DB Field Date   A field in my database has dates in the following string format: YYYYMMDD. However, the date format coming out of the Date Interface tool is YYYY-MM-DD. How can I change the date format coming out of the Date interface tool to match the date field in my database? I am pulling the data In-DB, so I don't want to change the date format of my data, which would require me to pull the data out of the database, hence, slowing things downs tremendously.   Prerequisites   Product - Designer   Procedure   In the Action Tool created between the Date interface tool and the Filter In-DB tool, choose the 'Update Value with Formula' action option. Select the 'Expression - value' in the 'Value or Attribute to Update' section. In the Formula section at the bottom of the Action tool configuration window, add the following formula: '"DateField"' + "=" + "'" + REGEX_Replace([#1], '-', '') +"'" This formula will remove the dashes in between the year and month and month and day from the date passed in by the Date interface tool in order to match the format of the field in the database. You can use other formulas, such as DateTimeFormat or DateTimeParse to modify the Date interface format to other formats as well.
View full article
How To: Tell a Database connection type at a glance   Below is a quick overview of how the different types of database connections appear within "workflow dependencies." This will help determine and compare different connection types from a quick glance.   Prerequisites   Product - Alteryx Database connection(s)   Procedure   To view connections in the Workflow Dependencies, go to Options > Advanced Options > Workflow Dependencies. (The same notes apply for connections viewed through the Input/Output tool configurations except for the Gallery Connection).     1. Saved Data Connection Saved Data Connections can be recognized by the aka: at the beginning of the Connection String. They include all connections the user created through Options > Advanced Options > Manage Data Connections as well as Oracle and SQL Server connections created through the "Quick Connect" option. Also see https://community.alteryx.com/t5/Alteryx-Designer-Knowledge-Base/Database-Connections-Creating-an-alias-and-the-advantages-of/ta-p/15836 Saved Data Connections are saved in xml files on the user's machine with passwords encrypted. %AppData%\Roaming\Alteryx\Engine\UserAlias.xml contains user connections and %ProgramData%\Alteryx\Engine\SystemAlias.xml contains system connections.   2. In-DB Connection In-DB Connections show the connection name the user picked when setting up the connection. All In-DB Connections are saved with encrypted passwords either in %AppData%\Roaming\Alteryx\Engine\UserConnections.xml for user connections or %ProgramData%\Alteryx\Engine\SystemConnections.xml for system connections.    3. In-DB Connection using a file In-DB connections using files point to the file storing the connection information. You can recognize these by the file extension .indbc. They also include the path to the .indbc file.   4. Gallery Connection Gallery connections are created by the Gallery admin and then shared with the user so they can use them on their local machine. They start with aka: like regular saved data connections. When viewed in the Input tool, you can see the connection name. In the workflow dependencies they show up as the key used to identify them in MongoDB.    5. DSN-less ODBC Connection Any connection using an ODBC driver starts with the keyword odbc: For a DSN-less connection, all relevant connection information is stored in the connection string.    6. ODBC w/DSN An ODBC connection using a DSN on the user's machine starts with the keyword odbc: then points to the DSN name. Additional parameters may be added to the connection string, such as username and password, they will override the information for the connection parameters stored with the DSN.    7. OleDB Connection An OleDB connection starts with the keyword odb: and contains all relevant connection information in the connection string. When selecting OleDB as the connection option in Alteryx, a wizard helps build the connection string.    8. Oracle OCI An Oracle OCI connection starts with the keyword oci: and requires a tnsnames.ora file.  By default, the  tnsnames . ora  file is located in the ORACLE_HOME/network/admin directory.   9. 32-bit Connection 32-bit connections can be made as long as a 32-bit driver is available (For ODBC, OleDB, Oracle clients). They can be recognized by the 32bit: keyword BEFORE any other keywords indicating the type of connection to use.    10. (SQL Server) Bulk connection Bulk connections have their own prefixes to let Alteryx know to expect a bulk connection, e.g. ssvb indicates a SQL Server Bulk Loader connection. They may have additional parameters added to the connection string.       Additional Resources   How To: Connect to an OleDB Data Source Connecting to an ODBC Datasource How To: Create an In-Database Connection
View full article
What happens when one installs the YXI file of a Python-based tool in Alteryx Designer.
View full article
Alteryx defaults to using the US/English Standard when it comes to number formats. However, for reporting purposes, it is important to remember that not all countries report their numbers in the same fashion. This article shows a quick and easy way to use Raw PCXML to convert numbers in to the Continental European Standard before outputting a final report. Throughout the workflow building process, numbers will be represented in the US/English Standard of 1,000.00.  However, when building an automated report, it is important to remember who the audience will be. In the case of users in countries that use the Continental European Standard, it may best to have Alteryx change the numerical formatting system before outputting the final report. The following example is specific for the Spanish-Spain numbering convention. Process   1. Pass the data through a Table tool to create a Table Report Snippet. 2. Insert a Report Text Tool and format as seen below. The LocaleID is what is specifically driving the formatting change.  For more information on other locale ID's check out this article. 3. Complete your layout and use a Render tool to complete your automated report. Please see the attached workflow for an example in practice.
View full article
  The Tree Interface can be a useful way to allow a user to select input values for an app.  Since sometimes setting up the Tree File Data Source can be a little tricky to those new to this interface, this example will step through the creation of the Data Source for a simple Tree Interface.   To use a Custom File or Database as the source for the Tree Interface tool, the source needs to be in a specific format: a table with a Description and a Key field.  It will look something like this:       And result in an interface that looks like this:       Let’s start with our original data, some very pretend pet statistics:         The first step is to determine the fields that will be used in the interface; in this case, we want to be able to select the fields Pet, Breed, and Year in the Tree Interface. These will become the different levels in the interface.           Next, we need to determine the level in which our fields of interest will appear in the tree -- the Pet field being the most general and Year being the most detailed. Sorting in this order will make sure all the data is aligned properly. All the Cat records will be together, then all the Breed records will be together, and finally all year records.       Once the data is sorted, unique identifiers need to be created for each record to establish the hierarchy.    The first level in the hierarchy is the Pet field. To create an identifier for each unique value in the Pet field, the Tile tool can be configured to look for Unique Values on the Pet field.  The unique value for the Pet field will be in the Tile_Num field.       This process needs to be repeated for the Breed and Year fields.  The Tile tool for the Breed field will again be configured to Unique, but this time under Unique Fields Pet and Breed will be selected.         Finally, Year.       For times when there are 10 or more levels in a Tree Tool, please see the Spoiler below: If there are 10 or more levels that need to be created for the Tree one more step will need to be done in order for the Tree Tool to differentiate each level.  For 10 or more levels you will want to apply the PadLeft() function to each level to give a buffer to each value for each level.  After the Tile tools used to create the key for each level use a Select tool to change the values to a string, then add a Multi-Field Formula tool to apply the PadLeft() function to each Tile_Num field: Adding the padding to the front of each level number will allow the concatenated values of all levels to be unique and should not cause issues when working with 10 or more levels in a Tree Interface. An additional workflow is attached that demonstrates adding the Padleft() portion, Tree Data Source 10 or more levels.yxmd (version 2018.4).     A little cleanup was done using a Select Tool. Three things were done: all the Tile_Sequence fields were removed, the Tile_Num fields were renamed to the appropriate Level number to make things a little easier in subsequent steps, and each Level field was changed to a string so they could be concatenated in the next step.   Now we have all the information we need to build a key for each level of our data for each record.  A Formula tool is used to create 3 new fields, one for a key at each level. Our Level 1 Key will just be the value from the Level 1 field.  The Level 2 Key will be the Level 1 Key concatenated with the Level 2 field, and the Level 3 Key will be the Level 2 Key concatenated with the Level 3 field.          Now that there is a key for each level we can construct a table that has the necessary Description and Key fields. Using a set of Select tools, select each Level Key field with its corresponding description field; Pet and Level 1 Key, Breed and Level 2 key, Year and Level 3 Key.             Now Union the three Select tools together by position.  Add a summarize tool and group by Pet and Level 1 Key.  Grouping by these fields will remove any duplicate records. The resulting fields were also renamed to Description and Key in the Summarize tool.      Finally, a Sort tool is added to sort the Key field in ascending order.  The results from the sort can then be saved to a file or loaded into a database and used in the Tree Interface tool.         The entire workflow:         Attached is the workflow used to build the Key list, as well as a very simple app that demonstrates the resulting tree created from the key values.   See how to put this into action in Part 2
View full article
How To: format common ODBC DSN-less connection strings   Many people need to make ODBC connections to external data, but they may be unsure of how to format their connection strings, particularly with DSN-less connections. Here is a reference guide with examples of common DSN-less ODBC connection string formats. Here is a reference guide with examples of common DSN-less ODBC connection string formats. For connection strings not covered below, information can be found through the database or driver documentation or through online resources such as connectionstrings.org.   DSN-less connection strings help make workflows easier to export to other computers, as the importing computer does not need a matching DSN configured in the ODBC Data Source Administrator.   Prerequisites   ODBC driver for external data source such as SQL Server, Cloudera, or Hadoop    Products   Designer, Gallery   Procedure   DSN-less connection strings typically include: 1. the driver name, 2. server address, 3. database name or port number, and depending the authentication type, 4. user id and password.   Standard ODBC DSN Connection string format   odbc:DSN={DSN_Name};UID={Username};PWD={Password};   DSN-less example   odbc: Driver={SQL Server Native Client 11.0}; UID={Username}; PWD={Password}; DATABASE={Database_name}; SERVER={Database_Host}   DSN-less trusted connection, the id and password are taken from the driver configuration   odbc: Driver={SQL Server Native Client 11.0}; DATABASE={Database_name}; SERVER={Database_Host}; Trusted_Connection=yes   ODBC Connection string formats for Hadoop and Cloudera platforms   There are separate Hadoop and Cloudrea platforms and one where both are combined into one. These platforms use the same ODBC driver types: Hive (data warehousing), Impala (massively parallel processing), and Spark (performance based processing).   For DSN connections there is only parameter: DSN=[DataSourceName] (that's it).    In DSN-less connections for Cloudera and Hadoop, the driver, host, and port are all included in the connection string along with the authentication mechanism.   The authentication mechanisms for these driver types are the same (AuthMech in the connection string). 0 = No Authentication 1 = Kerberos 2 = User Name - the UID may be omitted with anonymous login enabled 3 = User Name And Password   No Authentication   Driver=Simba Hive|Impala|Spark ODBC Driver;Host=[Server]; Port=[PortNumber];AuthMech=0;   Kerberos   Driver=Simba Hive|Impala|Spark ODBC Driver;Host=[Server]; Port=[PortNumber];AuthMech=1;KrbRealm=[Realm]; KrbHostFQDN=[DomainName];KrbServiceName=[ServiceName];   User Name   Driver=Simba Hive|Impala|Spark ODBC Driver;Host=[Server]; Port=[PortNumber];AuthMech=2;UID=[YourUserName];   User Name and Password   Driver=Simba Hive|Impala|Spark ODBC Driver;Host=[Server]; Port=[PortNumber];AuthMech=3;UID=[YourUserName]; PWD=[YourPassword];   Optional parameters that may need to be added to a connection string if configured are: ServerType, SSL, and ThriftTransport.   Common Issues   If all the correct values for a connection string are not known, errors with the connection occur. In Designer, check the Results window and Engine log for details. For scheduled workflows, the Service log may be helpful, as well as the Gallery log if the workflow is running from the Gallery. A local system administrator may be needed to verify correct the parameters for the connection string. Here are the default locations for Alteryx logs, check your System Settings if the logs are not found. %ProgramData%\Alteryx\Engine logs %ProgramData%\Alteryx\Gallery\Logs %ProgramData%\Alteryx\Service Additional Resources   Connection Strings is a great resource with a thorough list of connection string formats for Oracle, MS SQL, PostfreSQL, and Teradata (others as well). Simba Hive ODBC Install Guide  Simba Impala ODBC Install Guide  Simba Spark ODBC Install Guide Troubleshooting Database Connections  Data source name not found and no default driver specified errors 
View full article
Alteryx does a great job of simplifying our business processes, eliminating the need to maintain, document, and use Excel Macros. However, for that one workbook with 100’s (or even 1000’s) of lines of VBA code + months of development behind it, we have a simple way to integrate that Excel Macro within your workflow. This can greatly ease the transition from Excel to Alteryx and save you rework or buy you time to convert the process.   What we will use:   Alteryx’s Run Command tool VB Script to call our Macro An example can be found attached at the end of this post. Simply extract in Alteryx and Open.   To implement is very simple – place the Run Command tool where you need the Excel Macro to run in your workflow. This example shows the most basic workflow.     The command we will be executing is CScript, which can run Visual Basic Scripts. We will need to provide it a script; a simple one is shown below.   VBA_Example.vbs Option Explicit ' ----------- dim workbook_path workbook_path = ".\VBA_Example.xlsm" ' Place your workbook file here dim macro_name macro_name = "Macro1" ' Place your macro name here ' ----------- dim file_system dim full_workbook_path set file_system = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject") full_workbook_path = file_system.GetAbsolutePathName(workbook_path) ' File address housekeeping Dim ExcelProgram Set ExcelProgram = CreateObject("Excel.Application") ' Tell the script what Excel is ExcelProgram.Application.WorkBooks.Open full_workbook_path ' Open your workbook ExcelProgram.Application.Visible = False ' Open it in the background ExcelProgram.Application.Run "'"&full_workbook_path&"'!"&macro_name ' Run your Macro - this tells the Excel running in the background to find this workbook and macro. ExcelProgram.Application.displayalerts = False ' Do not show prompts since we want this to be automated - Could switch to True to get prompts ExcelProgram.Activeworkbook.Save ' Do not forget to save your work ExcelProgram.Activeworkbook.Close ' Close the workbook   This script will call “Macro1” from “VBA_Example.xlsm” – the macro, which is quite simple, puts the current time in the workbook.   Here is how the Run Command needs to be configured to call this script:     Write Source – 2 recommendations here:   Save off your data (attached example). Insert the data you are going to use in the macro, into a tab on the workbook. Read Results – again 2 recommendations:   Read the resulting worksheet the Excel Macro modifies (attached example). Read the data you originally saved coming into the Run Command. Command – CScript ; this Windows program executes VBScript files as if they were in the command line   Command Arguments – the filepath to your VBScript that calls the Excel Macro.   Working Directory – this could be left blank; however, it should be set to where the VBScript file is. The example uses the workflow directory since that is where it is.   Run Silent / Run Minimized – this should be set to match the True/False value in the VBScript below:   ExcelProgram.Application.displayalerts = False ' Do not show prompts since we want this to be automated - Could switch to True to get prompts   That’s all there is to it.
View full article
This article provides an overview of all things Alteryx licensing. This includes our prerequisites for installing and licensing Alteryx, an overview of different ways to activate, links to helpful guides and how to best administrate your keys once activated.   Prerequisites:   Before downloading Alteryx, be sure your machine meets our technical requirements.   Downloading Alteryx: All installers for Alteryx can be found through the licensing portal. The licensing portal provides users with an active license key access to all products purchased and all versions of that product that are currently supported. For new users we recommend downloading our latest version, which will be under the ‘New Versions’ tab. Should your company have a standardized version of Alteryx or an Alteryx Server, we recommend matching this version. Should they be on an older version, the user can access these installers through selecting the version under ‘Previous Versions’. If you don’t see the version of Alteryx you need, please reach out to the Fulfillment Team and they can assist you directly. Licensing Requirements: We recommend insuring that our services are white-listed by your IT group to insure the smoothest possible activation and set up process. Provided below are our current white-listing requirements for a successful online activation. On 2018.3 or newer: The white-listing requirements are provided below. Ports 80 and 443 are open. White-list the URL: https://whitelist.alteryx.com Older versions then 2018.3: White-listing requirements for versions older then 2018.3 will be different then all new versions. See your version’s licensing criteria here.   How to Activate Alteryx:   Online Activation: Online activation refers to inputting your license key into Alteryx through either the activation window, that appears upon opening Alteryx for the first time, or through Options > Manage Licenses > Activate New License. This method of activation is best for most users, as it allows a simple activation, easy transfer of licenses between users and devices, provides the ability to activate and deactivate any product keys that are no longer being used, and allows for the easiest administration of the keys for administrators. To activate online, you will need to insure your IT department has completed the white-listing criteria above. This allows for direct communication with our services and the administrator licensing portal. For further information about online activation please see our Online Activation Guide. Offline Activation: Offline Activation allows for those users who have restricted networks and are unable to communicate with our services to still activate Alteryx. This method does require the ability to access http://licenses.alteryx.com through an internet browser. An important note is that this activation type does restrict an administrator’s control over the keys after initial activation. Offline activated machines do not communicate with our licensing platform and the administrator licensing portal. This will result in users being unable to deactivate a key they are no longer using without assistance from the Fulfillment Team, and administrators being unable to easily remove and reassign licenses through the administrator portal. For further information about online activation please see our Offline Activation Guide. Command Line Activation/Silent Activation: Command Line Activation allows a license key to be activated by command line. This activation method is optimal for administrators who would like to push a license to a large number of users. Users’ IT groups can also install and activate Alteryx in batch through a script. Alteryx services must be white-listed to use this activation type. For these commands please see our Command Line Options. Alteryx License Server Activation: The Alteryx License Server, or ALS, is a secondary product Alteryx can provide administrators to better assist them with networking based restrictions and large scale deployments. This product hosts the licenses internally, and thus requires users to redirect their Designer or Server to this licensing service. This can be done by going to Options > Manage Licenses > Activate New License > Selecting ‘To Access Your License Server, Click Here’. Please note the first time connecting to your companies’ ALS, Alteryx will need to be run as Administrator to input the License Server’s URL. For further information about connecting the an ALS please see our Activating Through ALS Guide. To set up an ALS please see our ALS Administrator Guide. Transferring Licenses: License can be transferred between users through the method below. This method only applies to users who have completed an online activation, for offline license transfer, please reach out to our Fulfillment Team. In Alteryx: Click Options > Manage Licenses. Select the check box for each license you want to deactivate. Click Deactivate License. Click OK to confirm the deactivation. Once deactivated the key will be open for activation on a different device or by a different user. Should the device no longer be accessible please see our Revoke a License Help Documentation for how to remove a key from a inactive user or no longer accessible device.   Licensing Portal:   The Licensing Portal is a web based portal that allows access to all the product installers and associated licenses. The portal provides two views: End User and Administrator. End User is the default view, which only provides access to the product installers on Home Tab. The License Administrator view has access to downloads, licenses, machines and users. Here is a summary of each tab provided by the portal:   Home: Provides access to all downloads for products that have been purchased as well as the Offline Activation Upload. End Users will only see this tab. Licenses: Provides a list of all products and license keys associated with your group, and will include expiration dates, total seats and available seats. This allows administrators to identify keys with available seats and current products they have purchased that can be distributed to users. Machines: Contains a list of all devices associated with your license group. This does include all devices that are currently or have in the past activated a license key associated with this group. This view can be filtered by license key and email address to provide filtered lists containing current active users on a key, or locate a specific user to identify the key they are activated on, if any. Administrators can also revoke keys from inactive users or inaccessible devices from this tab. Accounts & Users: Accounts provides administrators a view of all the license groups they are associated with. This is beneficial for large companies who have multiple license groups. The Users view allows administrators to update or change a user’s permissions to the portal, including restricting access or providing a user with administrator permissions.   Should you have any other questions or need guidance on how to complete a task in the portal, please see our Administrator Check List, which provides direct links to all guides on all your permissions and abilities.   Common Errors:   Provided below is a list of the most common errors a user might run into and their fixes. An important note to keep in mind when running into an activation error is the type of key you have. Keys with dashes are compatible with version 11.8 and newer, keys without dashes are compatible with version 11.7 and older. Unrecognized License Key: This error typically occurs when you try to use the wrong key in the wrong version. Cannot Reach The Licensing Service: The device cannot communicate with our services, this error is common with users who have restrictions networks or proxies in place. The best solution to this would be to have your IT department white-list our services with the criteria under Licensing Requirements. If they are unable to do so please try an Offline Activation. Please note it is best have your IT department assist with adjusting your network settings before doing offline activation as license management will be easier. No Available Seats: The key the user is activating on has no seats left, please have your administrator check the licensing portal to identify any users can be removed from the key. Cannot Connect To License Server: This error is common for users who have accidentally opened the ALS License Manager instead of the default License Manager. The best way to move past this error is outlined in this Knowledge Base Article. Your error not here? Got questions about licensing requirements? Just want to say hi? Reach out to the Fulfillment Team with a screenshot of your error or any questions you might have and they’ll be able to get you back up and running!
View full article
The Alteryx License Server, or ALS, is a locally hosted license server meant to help customers with network restrictions activate in an online environment. It is built to exist outside of a company’s network and able to communicate directly with our third party licensing service, Flexera, but also communicate with user devices on secure local networks. Here are some helpful commands for working with it. 
View full article
Here at Alteryx we believe in working smart, not hard. Building out reports to highlight business-critical metrics is a pretty smart way to track goals. Customizing those reports to everyone in the department, then distributing them as attachments to individual emails? That sounds like a lot of hard work. Scheduling those reports from a refreshing data source each month so you don’t have to remake or rerun the reports yourself - that’s genius. Logging into your work computer to open up Alteryx, then having to check the scheduled results before having any peace of mind those reports were delivered without a hitch? Hard.
View full article
Too much connection data for an OCI driver may cause an OCIEnvCreate Error   An OCI error may occur when running a workflow from a network location with many OCI inputs: OCIEnvCreate Error: No error handle available to report exact OCI_ERROR.   Prerequisites   A Designer workflow with Input Data tools having OCI connections to an Oracle database.   Product - Alteryx Designer downloads.alteryx.com Product - Oracle Instant Client for validated versions see: Supported Data Sources Oracle download site: Oracle Instant Client downloads   Procedure   Decrease the total connection data that OCI driver in the Oracle Client has to process for the workflow. If the workflow is accessed from a network drive, try putting the workflow in a folder close to the root of the driver, rather than in a long folder directory, or move the workflow to your workstation instead of a network directory. If there are many OCI connections in the workflow, see if the same data could be imported with fewer connections.   The OCI driver is recording the network location of the workflow. Also, if the workflow contains multiple OCI inputs, the Oracle Client OCI driver appears to compile all of them together to create the workflow connections.    Common Issues   A maximum limit of connection data for an OCI driver can be reached In testing, we found that a maximum limit of connection data could be reached, and then the error would occur. The workflow would run fine with multiple OCI connections if the workflow was located on the workstation. However, when running the same workflow from a network drive, the length of the folder path would determine whether or not it would error out. Similarly, adding or removing more OCI inputs would have the same effect. A limit would be reached, and an error would occur beyond that limit.    Additional Resources   Oracle Call Interface Programmer's Guide OCIEnvCreate()  
View full article